What did we learn and what should we take forward from our legal education experience in COVID times?

Alyson Carrel (Northwestern), Cat Moon (Vanderbilt), and I (Michigan State) are co-hosting a virtual workshop on Thursday, June 24, 2021 at 9:00 CDT on this topic. Think of it as an “after action report” on legal education from March 2020 until now.

What did we learn? What don’t we want to leave behind or forget? How should we take the best lessons forward in practical ways?

“I want it to be a workshop where people come to work.”

When Cat and Allyson approached me with this idea, I said, “I want it to be a workshop where people come to work.” That’s what we are planning.

We are bringing together law school faculty and administrators, law students, and education experts to reflect on what we’ve all learned and work on ways to move forward. We are calling it the TRB Retrospective to reflect the thorn, rose, bud metaphor.

We’ll use dedicated groups and facilitated breakout rooms, with the goals of sharing learnings and giving you a group to carry a project forward with a committed team that you find at the workshop.

Learn more and apply at bit.ly/3hXvZAA

Application and approval required. Hope to see you there.


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Please join the Exponential Legal team on Wednesday, May 26, at 3:30 Eastern, for a free and open discussion about #productization of legal services. Our guest will be Greg Siskind and he will be sharing his insights into productization efforts and learnings in the area of immigration law. Greg has been working on some cool projects and it’s a great opportunity to learn about them, how Greg got started in productization, and the lessons he’s learned.

It’s also a great way to learn about our “The Essentials” course (and summer is the perfect time to take it – convince your employer to let you use some of that professional development travel budget you’ve saved your employer over the last year or so).

Go to Exponential.Legal and submit your email address to receive an invitation and details about this free event.

This session will be a great way to kickstart one of your new legal product ideas or just to learn about what legal products might look like. Hope to see you there.


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

The 2021 Global Law Lab Showcase and Meetup is must see Zoom TV at 8:00 EDT tonight. You’ll get the chance to learn more about 11 cool law labs pioneering new approaches to educating the 21st century legal professional, including the Michigan State University Center for Law, Technology & Innovation, where I am the Interim Director.

From the invitation page:

A collection of law labs from across the globe have decided to gather for a virtual breakfast/cocktail reception/meetup. Unfortunately, attendees will have to bring their own food and beverages as the meetup will take place on Zoom. We will provide a number of breakout rooms and the goal is to meet and chat with folks from law labs around the world. “What’s a law lab?” you ask. Check out each lab’s description below (the showcase) to get a feel for their work, and plan who you would like to meet with on the 11th/12th at the meetup.

I’ve put together a first draft (i.e., not perfect by any means) of a quick video intro to the Michigan State University Center for Law, Technology & Innovation for the showcase. If you’ve wanted to learn more about CLT&I, this video is a good starting point.

Hope to see you at the showcase.

The Michigan State University Center for Law, Technology & Innovation has a new Twitter feed at @MSULawTech.


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Logo for The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcastSeemed like a good time to catch up those of you who aren’t already regular subscribers or listeners to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on what shows we’ve released in 2021 so far. We are nearing the 300th episode, which should occur right at the end of the year by my calculations. We recently passed the 15th anniversary of the podcast.

I’m a little biased, but we’ve had some great shows so far this year.

Let us know what you think about the podcast, what topics you might like to hear us cover, and what questions you might have for us to answer on a show. You can call our Tech Question Hotline at 720-441-6820.

Good listening!


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

WOman putting on VR goggles - from Pexels
Please join the Michigan State University Center for Law, Technology & Innovation on March 26, 2021 (Friday) at 1:00 Eastern for a free Zoom presentation on current uses and possible future uses of Virtual Reality in the practice of law. Might some of your future work be done while wearing VR goggles? You’ll see examples of what is happening right now and discussion of the potential benefits and challenges of using VR in the practice of law.

VR gives us a great example of a technology on the near horizon and how the legal profession can anticipate and prepare for likely impacts in day-to-day law practice and interactions with all constituents of the legal system. How might the ethical duty of technology competence apply in the specific example of Virtual Reality?

LinkedIn Event Page with Zoom Information: https://www.linkedin.com/events/virtualrealityinthepracticeofla6779847226618466304/

Three sessions:

1:00 – 2:00 – Annie Morley of JUST will introduce VR in its current state, applications that are already happening in law practice, JUST’s VR app, and more.

2:00 – 3:00 – Yasmin Elayat, Co-founder of Scatter and new media artist, will discuss some of her work in using VR in the social justice area, some practical issues in making VR, and how VR and “immersive movie-making” might change our approaches to persuasion, presenting information, and educating people on complex and difficult issues.

3:00 – 4:00 – Panel discussion and Q & A on VR and what we might expect and prepare for. Amani Smathers, of Chapman & Cutler, will moderate a panel with Michigan Court of Appeals Judge Michelle Rick, Microsoft Assistant General Counsel Dennis Garcia, Davis Wright Tremaine’s Matt Jedreski, and Elevate’s Andy Ninh.

LinkedIn Event Page with Zoom Information: https://www.linkedin.com/events/virtualrealityinthepracticeofla6779847226618466304/


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Monk meditatingOne of the most valuable exercises I do routinely is the Personal Quarterly Offsite. It’s a straightforward concept with powerful results. I find it so helpful that I created an online course to share my approach and best practices. It’s called Productive Personal Quarterly Offsite for Busy Legal Professionals.

March is a fantastic time for a Personal Quarterly Offsite, especially to focus on progress on annual goals and make necessary revisions and changes. Goals, strategies, and planning can no longer be “set and forget” in COVID times.

From now until March 1, the course has a special sale price of US$99.99.

Starting on March 1, the price will be US$299.99.

Purchase here. More info here.

If 2021 already feels like it is drifting or starting to get away from you, this exercise is the best way I’ve found to get things back on course.

Purchase course here.


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Photo of comet in skyOn February 15, 2003, a comet flashed through the blogging universe:

And so it begins . . .
I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my website (https://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, and the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here

G'KarThe pop culture mavens among you will note the Babylon 5 reference in that first post. I find it somehow appropriate that Babylon 5 has now returned for on demand viewing on HBO Max.

Two days later, on my birthday, I wrote more about the motivation for the blog:

Today is my birthday. The blog is really my birthday present to myself. The start of a trend in gift giving?

Yes, that post would now work as a tweet. I wonder if it was the shortest post I ever made.

I’ve also said in some on my blogiversary / blawgiversary posts:

What I didn’t write about was how, at the time of the start of my blog, I had the overwhelming feeling that I was way too late to the game and that blogging had completely passed me by. Perhaps I over-reacted . . . . The other part of the story, which I don’t usually tell, is that starting my blog was never really about “blogging.” You see, I had been reading Dave Winer’s Scripting News for several years and had become enthusiastic about RSS feeds. In fact, I had produced an RSS feed for my website by hand before I did my blog. What I really wanted was an RSS feed, more so than a blog, and the blogging software (like Movable Type) provided the easiest way to generate an RSS feed. The trouble was that few people knew what blogs were in those days, and far fewer knew what RSS feeds were.

Over the years, in increasingly desperate attempts to get attention, I got the idea to turn the time of the anniversary of this blog into a bit of fun and a reader-appreciation week that I’ve referred to as either blogiversary or blawgiversary week, where I’ve done a number of different experiments, tried new things, and had some fun in ways that tend to earn me a little criticism from those who think that lawyer blogs should be oh so straight-laced and ever so much “on topic.” And never use a word like “blawgiversary.” Yet, I push onward.

I’ve also had a tendency to anthropomorphize my blog and let it speak for itself, even though that tends to result in my blog (1) complaining that I don’t post often enough and whining about the attention I give to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and the Kennedy Idea Propulsion Community and (2) shamelessly asking for blogiversary presents. In fairness, the blog has been a teenager for quite a while.

What I like to do for the blogiversary is to give something back to my readers. There are three things I’m giving this year because I love the Rule of Threes.

  1. From now until March 1, 2021, my online course “Productive Personal Quarterly Offsites for Busy Legal Professionals” will be available for US$99.99 instead of US$299.99. I find the Personal Quarterly Offsite practice incredibly valuable for me.
  2. Starting February 17 at 8:00 AM Pacific and running until 12:00 AM Pacific on February 24, you can purchase on Amazon the Kindle version of my book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and Other Legal Organizations, for US$9.99, a 51% discount off the regular price.
  3. On Clubhouse tonight (Monday, Feb 15, 5 PM PST), I’ll be co-hosting “Things I’ve screwed up: stories of failure in LegalTech” w/ Kristin Hodgins, Colin Lachance, Dennis Kennedy, Mike Whelan, and Mike Cappucci. Kristin describes it as “a lighthearted, casual room to share our stories of failure working in legal tech.” I do have some Clubhouse invitations available – message me on LinkedIn if you might want one

And, to my blog, I wish you the happiest of birthdays. We’ve been working on this together a long time and it’s hard to imagine how it would be without you. Hope to celebrate at least 18 more.

Comet photo by Jakub Novacek from Pexels


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

A work in progress

Part of my #blogfirst approach and an introduction to what I’m now doing at Exponential.Legal (launch date February 1, 2021).


Apollo 11 commemorative glass
Whitney Johnson has said that our “superpowers” are the things we often get complimented for and routinely deflect the compliments because “everyone can do that.” People who are known for generating lots of ideas or being innovators often fall into that pattern. They downplay their superpowers.

I reflected on my own innovation history and the story I have made out of that history when I was writing my book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law. Note how I separate “history” and “my story.”

It’s hard for me to think of “innovate” in the present tense.

For me, “innovation” is something that you see looking backward. It’s hard for me to think of “innovate” in the present tense. With very few exceptions, what I now see many innovations arose directly out of addressing real-world problems right in front of me, often with constraints that would make others give up. I sometimes like to say that innovation happens when you have no budget. Or a very small one – one software license, budget to attend one event or conference, the price of a book or two.

Looking back on my innovation history now, I see much more innovation now than I once did. A good deal must remain confidential, but some goes back a long way and I talk about them regularly, like automating all of my firm’s estate planning documents in 1990.

I’ve also, perhaps too slowly, moved from the common perspective that ideas are magical and intuitive and that some people are uniquely gifted to have more ideas than others. I lived in that world for a long time.

In recent years, I’ve realized that this perspective downplays the learning, collaboration, and plain hard work that characterizes ‘idea people.’ And the willingness to move out of their own silos to get and bring back insights.

There are three things that characterize my use of ideas and the value I bring to ideation, and none of them is the large volume of ideas people often associate with me.

There are three things that characterize my use of ideas and the value I bring to ideation, and none of them is the large volume of ideas people often associate with me.

  • First, I always pull from areas outside the focus area or silo. That’s essential for me.
  • Second, ideas are just ideas, not parts of me. A criticism of my idea is not a criticism of me. I can move forward and help us keep improving ideas. Sometimes, it bothers me that people don’t like my favorite idea, but it’s usually not the right forum and I can use it later elsewhere if I want.
  • Third, Mike Cappucci, a while back, referred to me as an “idea therapist.” I like to help people question their ideas, evolve them, and achieve their potential by asking questions and making small suggestions to change someone’s perspective.

In the last few years, I began to realize that the “magical” approach to innovation was both not right and kind of lazy on my part. Was I supposed to just sit around and wait for inspiration to hit me? If my best ideas came to me on bike rides or in the shower, did that mean I should just take more bike rides or showers?

The “bolt of lightning” for me was the realization that innovation and all that associated with it was a discipline that people had been working on for many years and there was a lot of literature and learning out there. In fact, it was a mature field with lots of giants already leading the way once I got out of my legal silo.
And that’s where I’ve concentrated. I saw that much of what I thought I had created out of thin air reflected standard innovation practices and my own variations of standard innovation tools. There were systematic processes and approaches that showed up, often in sloppy ways, in my efforts. My time with the people in the Mastercard Digital Payments and Labs group taught me a lot about practical innovation skills.

I began to adopt the innovation processes I found that fit me best and follow and learn from, dare I say it, innovators in the field of innovation. I’ve put a lot of that, along with quite a few experiments, into the law school classes I’ve taught.

Working intensively for several days with Mike Cappucci and Dean Khialani gave me the chance to be involved with two people thinking deeply about productization of legal services as a form of innovation in law. Having them tell me that one of my articles on productization of legal services inspired them was flattering, to be sure, but I appreciated getting to see the early stages of the Launch Lifecycle approach that you will find in the Exponential Legal course.

I decided a while back that I wanted to refer to myself as a “consulting innovator,” playing off Sherlock Holmes’s job title: “Consulting Detective.” However, Holmes had Watson, Mr. Hudson, Lestrade, the Baker Street Irregulars, and many more.

And that also forced me to confront one of the biggest aspects of innovation that I’ve been trying to fool myself about: No matter how much I’d like to convince myself that I can do innovation all by myself, it truly is a team game.

I decided a while back that I wanted to refer to myself as a “consulting innovator,” playing off Sherlock Holmes’s job title: “Consulting Detective.” However, Holmes had Watson, Mr. Hudson, Lestrade, the Baker Street Irregulars, and many more.

I’ve learned from hundreds of innovators over the years. Collaboration is essential. Because Tom Mighell and I wrote a book called “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies,” you might have thought that I would have had that realization a bit earlier than I did.

Whenever I talk with other people doing innovative things in law, they often seem to be working alone, under-appreciated, without recognition. The word I most often hear from this group of people: “frustrated.” I’ve been there.

Fortunately, the other Exponential Legal founders, Mike Cappucci, Christie Guimond, and Marc Lauritsen, have both pulled me into the very cool Exponential Legal project and helped me realized important (and fun) it is to be part of a great team. I can’t wait to see how this evolves.

The takeaway: Innovation is a discipline. It can be learned and be made repeatable. The Exponential Legal course, I’m convinced, is a great way to do that in law, especially in the area of productization, which is more important than ever. We can also build a community of innovators in the process. I’m excited about that. If you might be too, check out Exponential.Legal and join us on this great journey.


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

For many years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read 67 books, exceeding my goal by quite a bit. Or, more accurately, I listed 67 books that I read. I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I thought that I might do more reading than ever in a  year of pandemic. That wasn’t the case. In 2019, the number was 89.

I’d guess that I probably started more books without finishing them than I ever have before. I also probably read more audiobooks than ever before

You will also notice that I’ve been attempting to read the entire catalog of books of certain authors of detective stories.If you forced me to pick my top books for 2020 (in alphabetical order) that I’d recommend, I’d probably list:

Agency, William Gibson 

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Demand-side Sales 101, Bob Moesta

Hit Refresh, Satya Nadella

Influenza, Dr. Jeremy Brown

Junkyard Planet, Adam Minter

Stamped from the Beginning, Ibram X. Kendi

The Brain’s Way of Healing, Norman Doidge

The Expertise Economy, Kelly Palmer and David Blake

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes, Dan Egan

The Peripheral, William Gibson

Why Customers Buy . . . And Why They Don’t, Martin Lewis

I’m doing the same thing in 2021. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

November

October

September

August

44. The Cellist, Daniel Silva
43. The Verge, Patrick Wyman
42. Pipe Dreams, Chelsea Ward
41. Together We Will Go, J. Michael Straczynski

July

40. Learn Like a Pro, Barbara Oakley and Olav Schewe
39. The Thinker’s Toolkit, Moran Jones
38. AMC’s Complete Guide to Trail Building and Maintenance, Ryan Harvey
37. Castle Shade, Lauri R. King
36. Better Data Visualizations, Jonathan Schwabish
35. The Plague Cycle, Charles Kenny
34. Broad Band, Claire Evans
33. Filters Against Folly, Garrett Hardin
32. Kindred, Rebecca Sykes
31. Essential Hempcrete Construction, Chris Magwood
30. The Model Thinker, Scott Page
29. Essential Sustainable Home Design, Chris Magwood
28. Exercised, Daniel Lieberman

June

27. Brain-centric Design, Rich Carr and Kieran O’Mahoney
26. The Kobalt Dossier, Eric Van Lustbader
25. The Secret World of Weather, Tristan Gooley
24. Effortless, Greg McKeown
23. Becoming a Writer Saying a Writer, J. Michael Straczynski
22. This is How They Tell Me the World Ends, Nicole Perloth

May

21. How to Be an Antiracist, Ibram Kendi
20. How to Draw Without Talent, Danny Gregory
19. How Buildings Learn, Stewart Brand
18. A Brief History of Earth, Andrew Knoll
17. A Timeless Way of Building, Christopher Alexander
16. A Pattern Language, Christopher Alexander
15. Technological Revolution and Financial Capital, Carlota Perez
14. Welcome to the Jungle, Hilary Smith
13. Billion Dollar Whale, Tom Wright
12. Creative Confidence, Tom Kelley

April

11. The Code Breaker, Walter Isaacson
10. Four Lost Cities, Annalee Newitz
9. The Data Detective, Tim Harford

March

8. Not Dark Yet, Peter RObinson
7. The Darkness, Ragnar Jonasson
6. American Traitor, Brad Taylor

February

5. Parable of the Talents, Octavia Butler

January

4. Parable of the Sower, Octavia Butler
3. Testing Business Ideas, David Bland & Alex Osterwalder
2. I Came as a Shadow, John Thompson
1. The Price of Peace, Zachary Carter


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Coltrane and Pollock photosI held my December personal quarterly offsite yesterday. It was enormously productive and you’ll hear more about it later. I love this approach to planning, especially in our current tumultuous times.

The big takeaway for me is summed up by the following quote on my office bulletin board from Whitney Johnson.

Some of you will recognize it from her approach of focusing on market risk rather than competitive risk.

However, it also captures something of the John Coltrane and Jackson Pollock pictures above and the guitar photo at the bottom of this post.

Play where no one else is playing poster

 

Let it rock!


[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.