I’m excited to point readers to the ABA Legal Technology Resource Center’s 2016 Women of Legal Tech list. ltrc-temporary-logo

As the announcement says:

One of the American Bar Association’s core values is a commitment to diversity, which the Law Practice Division aims to reinforce in the legal tech sector. This year, approximately 30% of the ABA TECHSHOW faculty were women, and nearly half of the TECHSHOW Planning Board is comprised of women.

From tech founders and CEOs to small business owners, women are making a big impact on legal tech in every field.

In keeping with the spirit of progress, the Legal Technology Resource Center is proud to present its inaugural “Women of Legal Tech” for 2016. Our goal is to celebrate the women currently in the legal tech space, and to encourage more women to join the ranks.

The list grows out of a very influential post by Heidi Alexander last year that highlighted women in legal tech.

This year’s “Women of Legal Tech” includes a set of 50 talented and influential women, based upon an initial list of 40 created by Law Technology Today contributor and practice management advisor, Heidi Alexander, in 2015. The new ten women of this year’s list were selected by the LTRC Board.

I was so happy when Sofia Lingos, vice-chair of LTRC, brought me the news that Heidi had proposed that LTRC become the home for her list and a place where the list could become even more visible and influential. As chair of LTRC this year (and, I hope, at least next year too), I want to highlight the work done by Sofia, Heidi, Gwynne Monahan, Allison Shields, Wendy Werner and Rose Frommelt on this project. This project could not have been in better hands.

As post says:

In keeping with the spirit of progress, the Legal Technology Resource Center is proud to present its inaugural “Women of Legal Tech” for 2016. Our goal is to celebrate the women currently in the legal tech space, and to encourage more women to join the ranks.

To celebrate AND to encourage.

When Heidi’s original post appeared in 2015, I celebrated it as a place to point people who said to me that they “couldn’t find” women to speak on legal tech. This list gives them no excuses anymore. As some readers know, I actively avoid appearing on any men-only panels. This list will make it easier for me to accomplish that and help many conferences and events gain from adding excellent speakers from this Women of Legal Tech list.

As the post concludes:

LTRC congratulates the first “Women in Legal Tech” class and looks forward to highlighting even more talented women in 2017.

If you haven’t visited the Legal Technology Resource Center in a while, I encourage you to stop by and see what we are doing.

– Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I’m excited to point readers to the ABA Legal Technology Resource Center’s 2016 Women of Legal Tech list. ltrc-temporary-logo

As the announcement says:

One of the American Bar Association’s core values is a commitment to diversity, which the Law Practice Division aims to reinforce in the legal tech sector. This year, approximately 30% of the ABA TECHSHOW faculty were women, and nearly half of the TECHSHOW Planning Board is comprised of women.

From tech founders and CEOs to small business owners, women are making a big impact on legal tech in every field.

In keeping with the spirit of progress, the Legal Technology Resource Center is proud to present its inaugural “Women of Legal Tech” for 2016. Our goal is to celebrate the women currently in the legal tech space, and to encourage more women to join the ranks.

The list grows out of a very influential post by Heidi Alexander last year that highlighted women in legal tech.

This year’s “Women of Legal Tech” includes a set of 50 talented and influential women, based upon an initial list of 40 created by Law Technology Today contributor and practice management advisor, Heidi Alexander, in 2015. The new ten women of this year’s list were selected by the LTRC Board.

I was so happy when Sofia Lingos, vice-chair of LTRC, brought me the news that Heidi had proposed that LTRC become the home for her list and a place where the list could become even more visible and influential. As chair of LTRC this year (and, I hope, at least next year too), I want to highlight the work done by Sofia, Heidi, Gwynne Monahan, Allison Shields, Wendy Werner and Rose Frommelt on this project. This project could not have been in better hands.

As post says:

In keeping with the spirit of progress, the Legal Technology Resource Center is proud to present its inaugural “Women of Legal Tech” for 2016. Our goal is to celebrate the women currently in the legal tech space, and to encourage more women to join the ranks.

To celebrate AND to encourage.

When Heidi’s original post appeared in 2015, I celebrated it as a place to point people who said to me that they “couldn’t find” women to speak on legal tech. This list gives them no excuses anymore. As some readers know, I actively avoid appearing on any men-only panels. This list will make it easier for me to accomplish that and help many conferences and events gain from adding excellent speakers from this Women of Legal Tech list.

As the post concludes:

LTRC congratulates the first “Women in Legal Tech” class and looks forward to highlighting even more talented women in 2017.

If you haven’t visited the Legal Technology Resource Center in a while, I encourage you to stop by and see what we are doing.

– Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Birthday Cake with PineappleLong-time readers of this blog will know that today is the blawgiversary of DennisKennedy.Blog. I started this blog on February 15, 2003, and we (my blog and me) are marking its thirteenth birthday today. That makes DennisKennedy.Blog a teenager. Much more about that in a minute.

In previous years, I marked the week of the blogiversary with a weeklong combined celebration of my blog’s birthday and my birthday (February 17 – shout out to birthday sharers Michael Jordan and Jim Brown). The issue of “sharing” birthday celebrations came up this year and, as you’ll notice from the title of this post, “we” decided to do something different this year.

When you have written a blog as long as I have, two things will surprise you. The first is that your blog starts to take on a life of its own and begins to talk to you, especially about its “feelings” and “needs.” The second is that you are constantly surprised which posts set off a negative reaction from readers.

This morning, we had the combination of those two things.

The problem, it seems, was yesterday’s post – a seemingly innocuous post about some of my recent writings outside the blog and some recent podcasts.

I could not have predicted the firestorm. However, when you have a new teenager, you can’t predict anything.

To make a long story short, my blog and I had what they call these days a “good talk” this morning. If you know teenagers, it won’t surprise you that words like “unfair,” “independence,” “old enough,” and the like were flying around. I also heard the word “boring” and “old man” more times than I cared to hear them.

As I now understand it, yesterday’s post hit a tender spot that I apparently have not been listening to the blog enough about. In retrospect, I get the blog’s perspective, but sheesh. Yes, the post did refer to writing I have done in places other than the blog. And, yes, I am aware that my blog sees my podcast as competition for my time, attention and best work. I now better understand why my blog found this so upsetting.

And you don’t even want to hear the comments my blog made about my use of social media.

On the other hand, I do think my best work and content lately has been on the podcast. I won’t apologize for that. I was a bit surprised, however, that my blog has been skyping with Tom Mighell’s blog and commiserating about their perceived neglect from their authors. Not to oversimplify, but they are jealous of the podcast.

For most of the discussion, if I can call it that, I listened. I also tried to make rational arguments, justifications and excuses. I also tried changing the subject and a variety of other tricks. My blog was having none of that and, I’ll admit that I’m impressed, stuck to its guns and made all of its points.

The blog even tried to get me to express my feelings and emotions.

It’s was a difficult conversation. I’m still mulling over some of the blog’s points.

One of the things that came through loud and clear is that my blog feels it deserves my most creative work. It kept returning to the point that I was no longer writing posts like the Metallica LexThink post and the Steve Gadd copyright post. And that I should be. (NIt also wants me to fix some of the internal links on the blog so that people don’t have to search for old posts using the search box at the top of the right column. I get the point.)

My blog’s contention is that posts like those are what my real audience wants and not pointers to things I’ve done in other places. Especially on my podcast. At one point, my blog literally threw a “Legal Talk Network” t-shirt across the room.

Not too surprisingly, the subject of being “old enough” for a tattoo again came up. Again.

In the past, I’ve been able to say that the blog is too young and that I make all the decisions. And my threat of getting an ear pierced and wearing an earring was a deterrent the blog on the tattoo front because it did not want to be embarrassed to death. Now, my blog seems ready to call my bluff. I’m still not convinced that my blog’s tattoo idea – a large “Cloud” with a lightning bolt that says “You only live once” is the best choice, but I understand its point that it has long been living with a photo of me “tattooed” on its front page and, even worse for it, a logo and feed for the podcast.

The bottom line. We agreed that DennisKennedy.Blog gets its own separate birthday celebration this year and going forward. We also agreed that any birthday presents to the blog will be the blog’s presents and not shared with me. Unless it wants to share – not likely.

I also agreed that I would ask readers to let us know in the comments what direction you would like to see the blog take going forward. Keep in mind, however, that my blog will see your comments before I do.

And I agreed that I needed to pay more attention to my blog and consider its feelings.

It was a difficult, contentious discussion, but a worthwhile one that will help us begin to plot a path forward.

We hugged it out at the end and said “good talk,” both nervously looking around to make sure no one was watching us.

So, I wish my blog a happy thirteenth birthday, salute it for becoming a teenager and invite you to do the same. It’s been a pleasure writing the blog all these years and I look forward to many more.

– Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

The 2015 ABA TECHREPORT is out. 2015cover.jpg.imagep.107x141

The TECHREPORT is a set of free articles where the American Bar Association’s Legal Technology Resource Center has legal technology expert analyze and summarize data from the 2015 ABA Legal Technology Survey Report.

I chipped in with an article on cloud computing survey results. The highlights:

Law firm managing partners had the highest level of reported cloud usage (46%) and a noticeably more positive response to the cloud than partners or associates.

Confidentiality, security, data control and ownership, ethics, vendor reputation and longevity, and other concerns weigh heavily on the minds of lawyers. Yet the employment of precautionary measures is quite low, with no more than 40% of respondents actually taking any one of the standard cautionary measures listed in the 2015 Survey. A shocking 16% reported taking no precautions of the types listed.

The results indicate that lawyers are becoming more familiar with cloud technologies and are attracted by anytime, anywhere access, low cost of entry, and predictable monthly expenses. Interestingly, the top features of cloud services cited by those using the cloud is different from the features those not using the cloud consider most important.

Speaking of LTRC, the excellent Law Technology Today blog has a new roundtable article called “Don’t Be Afraid, It’s Just New Technology” featuring members of the LTRC Board discussing the best ways to learn about new technology. I’m one of the panelists and part of a stellar group.

Finally, Tom Mighell and I have been cranking out episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on regular basis (usually every other Friday) on the Legal Talk Network. I encourage you to listen the some of the recent ones:

Please enjoy.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

Last year, I read 53 books, just topping the goal. Or, more accurately, I listed 53 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2016. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were the Sidney Chambers series and a start on Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

59. The End of Dieting, Joel Fuhrman
58. Spark Joy, Marie Kondo
57. A Great Reckoning, Louise Penny
56. Please Kill Me, Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

November

55. Mapping Decline, Colin Gordon
54. Breaking Cover, Stella Rimington
53. An Obvious Fact, Craig Johnson
52. Think Simple, Ken Segall

October

51. Visual Intelligence, Amy Herman
50. The Noise of Time, Julian Barnes

September

49. Back from the Dead, Bill Walton
48. Any Minute Now, Eric Van Lustbader
47. The Other Side of Silence, Philip Kerr
46. The Index Card, helaine Olan and Harold Pollack

August

45. Daniel Silva, THe Black Widow
44. The Highwayman, Craig Johnson
43. The Bourne Enigma, Eric Van Lustbader
42. Even Dogs in the Wild, Ian Rankin

July

41. My Life in Middlemarch, Rebecca Mead
40. Secular Meditation, Rick Heller
39. The Encore Career Handbook, Marci ALboher
38. How to Make Your Money Last, Jane Bryant Quinn
37. The More of Less, Joshua Becker
36. The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly
35. Change Your Brain, Change Your Body, Daniel Amen
34. Change Your Brain, Change Your Life, Daniel Amen
33. The Mechanical Horse, Margaret Guroff

June

32. The Wolves, Alex Berenson
31. Living Forward, Michael Hyatt
30. The Green Mill Murder, Kerry Greenwood
29. The Castlemaine Murders, Kerry Greenwood

May

28. Dead Man’s Chest, Kerry Greenwood
27. Sprint, Jake Knapp
26. My Adventures with Your Money, T.D. Thornton

April

25. The Mulberry Bush, Charles McCarry
24. Murder in Montparnasse, Kerry Greenwood
23. Death Before Wicket, Kerry Greenwood
22. SPQR – A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
21. A Coffin for Dimitrios, Eric Ambler

March

20. In a Sunburned Country, Bill Bryson
19. Primary Greatness, Stephen Covey
18. Queen of the Flowers, Kerry Greenwood
17. Away with the Fairies, Kerry Greenwood

February

16. The Mark Inside, Amy Reading
15. What to DO to Retire Successfully, Martin Goldstein
14. The Last Kingdom, Bernard Cornwell
13. Murder on the Ballarat Train, Kerry Greenwood
12. The Spy House, Matthew Dunn
11. An Officer and a Spy, Robert Harris
10. Raisins and Almonds, Kerry Greenwood

January

9. The Gifts of Imperfection, Brene Brown
8. Quiet, Susan Cain
7. Pirate Latitudes, Michael Crichton
6. The Stuff of Life, Mark Schultz
5. APIs: A Strategy Guide, Daniel Jacobson, Greg Brail and Dan Woods
4. Momofuku, David Chang and Peter Meehan
3. Vision to Reality, Honoree Corder
2. Kettlebell Simple & Sinister, Pavel Tsatsouline
1. The War of Art, Steven Pressfield

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Dennis Kennedy photographed on December 19, 2010.Last summer, I was asked the question “Are there really too many lawyers?” I wrote a reply and remembered the other day that I never posted it.

Unlike when you write something for a print publication and might have to wait months for an article to appear, the great benefit of having your own blog is that you can publish it to the world immediately – assuming that you remember to do so.

In the spirit of clearing out 2015 to get a fresh start in 2016, here’s my answer, at least last summer (because I haven’t edited it), to the question “Are there really too many lawyers?”

Are there really too many lawyers?

The science fiction writer William Gibson (@greatdismal) his the source of the well-known quote, “The future has arrived – it’s just not evenly distributed yet.” That’s a good framework to consider the “too many lawyers” question.

That question suggests that the primary issue is one of quantity and the Goldilocksian test of too much, too little or just right. However, that approach misses the most interesting and important facets of the question – distribution, allocation and, ultimately, adaptability of lawyers and the legal profession.

There are a lot of lawyers in the US – a whole lot of them – and many more enter the profession every year. Lawyers also have a tendency not to retire, at least not at an age like 65. The total number inexorably grows.

At the same time, we all see stats that perhaps 80% of people (and probably small businesses) can’t afford or find the lawyers to perform the legal services they need. There are areas like public defenders, judges and certain practice areas where there is a strong feeling that there simply aren’t enough lawyers. In my own world of information technology law, I would say that there is a severe shortage of lawyers knowledgeable in the practice area, which expands and grows more complex almost daily, or so it seems.

Perhaps paradoxically, we also live at a time where it is very difficult for lawyers to get tradition law firm jobs. Some would argue that we’ve had a few “lost years” where only a very small fraction of law school graduates got traditional law opportunities.

What I see is not a “quantity” issue, but an imbalance of supply and demand. In other words, the future of legal services might already be here, but it’s not evenly distributed yet. There is a mismatch of client need and lawyer availability, all aggravated by technology change (think Internet), geographic mobility (general population but not lawyer regulation) and, increasingly, globalization.

The “too many lawyers” question, to me, opens up the issues of legal service distribution and allocation of legal resources and alignment with the changing needs of an increasingly mobile, global and savvy client population with difficult and novel legal issues.

In so many ways, the practice of law has never been so interesting as it is today, with opportunities for creative approaches, futuristic technology tools, and ways to play a key role in the accelerating pace of change we see today.

However, too often today lawyers bemoan the “decline of the profession,” want to pull up the drawbridges and fill up the moats, and try to go back in time to some “mythical good times.”

We live in a world where commerce routes around “friction.” Lawyers have too often allowed themselves to be seen as part of the friction rather than the enablers of new approaches. The path of the Internet is littered with those who felt that what they did was so unique that the Internet would not be able to route around them.

The successful lawyers of the near future will be those who can better distribute and make available their services to the clients who need them. The successful firms will be the ones best able to identify, hire, retain and allocate lawyers to client needs. It’s not rocket science, but it requires a clear-eyed look at the present and the future and a willingness to look to new models rather than return to old structures. At least in my opinion.

The key is adaptability. Can lawyers adapt to changing times? It is reasonable to expect drastic changes on a regular basis within traditional practice areas. It is reasonable to expect clients to change, evolve and disappear. Lawyers must be adaptable to an accelerating pace of change.

Too many lawyers? I don’t know if there’s a magic number. I do know that the number of lawyers is not well distributed from the client perspective. Too many lawyers with adaptability? Not by a long shot. And, unfortunately for many lawyers who hesitate on adapting, the future is already here.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Welcome to the 2015 edition of Dennis Kennedy’s annual Best of Law-related Blogging Awards, affectionately known as the “Blawggies.”

Dennis Kennedy photo
The Blawggies, which honor the best law-related blogs as determined from my personal and highly-opinionated perspective, were first unleashed on an unsuspecting blogosphere in December 2004 and are an annual tradition here at DennisKennedy.Blog.

In perhaps the majority of those 12 years, there has been an end-of-the-year debate about whether blogging, especially law-related blogging is “dead” or no longer relevant. 2015 is no exception. I like what Kevin O’Keefe has to say on that topic.

I’ve started to wonder whether there might be some truth and substance at the foundation of those questions. It strikes me there are fewer memorably individual blogs than ever before even though there are plenty of firm and group blogs. And there are plenty of niche and practice-area blogs. However, there is definitely less of what Dave Winer drives at in his seminal definition of a blog – “the unedited voice of a person.” I have always liked that definition of blogging.

I also realize that the blogs I read are not the same blogs that many other lawyers read – for many different reasons. It has become difficult to appreciate what blogs are part of what the “general legal audience” reads. Perhaps selfishly (and tautologically), I ultimately care about only the blogs that I care about.

At the same time, longtime bloggers have turned to social media, podcasts and video as better media for them than blogging, even though their blogs still exist. I’m an example of that, with a posting frequency of about a post a month. I see the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast as the primary outlet for what I was once writing on my blog. TKMR Logo
To a lesser extent, my ABA Journal column is also an outlet for material that would have gone into my blog in the past.

ANNOUNCING THE 2015 BLAWGGIE WINNERS. When I looked over the 2014 Blawggie awards in preparation for making the 2015 Blawggie awards, I decided that it really was a good list and I wasn’t sure how I’d change it for 2015.

After much thought and consultation, my blog and I have decided that for the 2015 Blawggie Awards, the winners are the 2014 Blawggie Award winners.

In a way, that feels a bit like cheating, so we needed to come up with something extra for you the reader.

Since I have have turned so much toward audio and podcasts for information and entertainment in the place of blogs, I thought it might be good to offer readers a glimpse into the podcasts I listen to and how I now use podcasts.

Podcast Listening App. Another iTunes update that broke the Podcast app, and I moved away from iTunes plus the Apple Podcast app to the dedicated podcast app, Overcast (now free). Although there are some differences that impact the way I used to organize podcasts for listening, I’m generally happy with the switch, especially Overcast’s approach to speeding up the playback of podcasts and squeezing dead air out of podcasts. You can also use Overcast as an online service at Overcast.FM.

Podcast Search. I found iTunes podcast search to be a great way to do research. If I wanted a good overview of a topic, an interview of a book author, or other information, either introductory or advanced, on a topic, searching for relevant podcast episodes on iTunes was a great way to do that. Overcast is not as good, but OK for now. I cannot recommend this approach to using podcasts episodes to find focused information enough. Another handy podcast search tool is Huffduffer.

Listen to Podcasts on a Trial Basis. When I find an interesting podcast, go ahead and subscribe to it. If it’s not that interesting to me, I unsubscribe fairly quickly. Not all podcasts or podcasts episodes are great or what you want. That’s why listening at a higher speed is a great approach. Listen and edit aggressively.

Law-related Podcasts. The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast is on the Legal Talk Network. LTN has a lot of great law-related podcasts and is always the best place to start for finding useful law-related podcasts in one place. For other law-related podcasts, you’ll have to do some searching and know what you are looking for. Using iTunes to search for and identify promising podcasts in your area of interest is a great way to start.

Podcasts Related to Your Practice. Ultimately, law-related podcasts may not be the tool that helps you the most. If you represent clients in certain industries, podcasts on the industries might be way more helpful to you than legal podcasts. In my world of digital payments, podcasts like the Consult Hyperion podcast and Payments of Fire are much more useful that any law-related podcasts I’ve found. Podcasts that keep you up on news, developments, trends, industry players and the like may well make your clients feel that you are much more helpful as a lawyer.

A Huge Sampling of Podcasts I Listen to These Days. I’m disappointed that there’s not a great way to collect, send out and share links to podcasts episodes that you like. Huffduffer is one example. Some people tweet about a great podcast episode. But it’s hard to make the move from seeing a link to listening to the episode. Here are some podcasts I’ve enjoyed at various time in 2015 to give you some ideas of what podcasts you might want to try. I’ve added links (a process that only reinforced for me how difficult it is to share links to podcasts – I suggest looking for any of these that interests you in iTunes our the podcast app you use).

A16z
Ari Meisel – Less Doing
Bill Simmons Podcast
Consult Hyperion podcast
Cool Tools
The Critical Path
The Current from CBC Radio
Cycling 360
Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast
Great Work Podcast
Happier with Gretchen Rubin
HBR Idealist
In Our Time
the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast (of course)
Lawyerist Podcast
Legal Talk Network podcasts
Listen to Lucy (Financial Times)
Mac Power Users
The Needle and the Mouse
Pardon the Interruption
Payments of Fire
Rdella Training
Seminars about Long-term Thinking
The Slate Political Gabfest
Spark from CBC Radio
TechNation Radio Podcast
The Torch: The Great Courses Podcast
Wealthtrack’s Podcast
What’s the Point

Well, there you have it – the 2015 Blawggie Awards post. The winners can be found here. The Blawggies have always aimed to inform, educate and surprise. In 2015, the emphasis was on surprise.

Best wishes to all for 2016.

– DennisKennedy.Blog and Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I’m a big fan of the Law Technology Today blog. [Disclosure: I’m the chair of the board for the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center, which publishes the blog.

Dennis Kennedy photographed on December 19, 2010.

A new monthly feature of the blog is a roundtable discussion post featuring members of the LTRC Board and occasional guests. The series is a great way to hear the perspectives of some of the leading thinkers on legal technology issues in an accessible and fun way.

The format has been to serve up five questions on a topic to the roundtable participants and let the participants run with the questions.

The November roundtable on password management is probably the best one so far, in large part due to the large number of participants. While it was a little crowded around the table, I believe the the more the merrier.

The password management discussion is full of practical tips, key insights and informed perspectives. You can learn a lot from the discussion. I sure did.

Earlier roundtables covered artificial intelligence, automation and digital assistants.

I invite you to read the roundtable posts and to visit the Law Technology Today blog on a regular basis, or, even better, subscribe to it in your favorite newsreader. The LTRC board also welcomes your comments and suggestions for future roundtable topics.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I developed a new presentation on technology competence and legal ethics for the recent Missouri Bar Lex Port 2015 conference.

Lex Port Start Slide

I took a new and practical approach and wrote the following as part of the handout materials. It largely reflects the direction I took in the presentation.

Let me know what you think of this approach.

Timely Technology Competence Tips for the Non-Technological Lawyer

The Key Text. Continue Reading Timely Technology Competence Tips for the Non-Technological Lawyer

There’s been a lot of discussion about how the definition of “competence” for lawyers also includes the duty to keep up with applicable technologies.

Talk can be cheap, but the good news is that doing something about learning about applicable technologies lawyers can be an inexpensive proposition, at least in the St. Louis, Missouri area.

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Exhibit A on this topic is the Missouri Bar’s Lex Port 2015, which takes place on October 26 – 27 this year. Early bird pricing of $259 for up to 12.2 tech-focused CLE hours and up to 4.2 hours of ethics CLE. In Missouri, that will satisfy your ethics CLE requirement for two years.

There looks to be a ton of great sessions with some nationally-known speakers. Here’s the program brochure.

I’ve already turned in my handout materials – early. Just something for program planners to keep in mind about me.

I’ll be doing three presentations:

  1. Taking LinkedIn to the Next Level
  2. (more important now than ever)

  3. Technical Competence and the Rules of Professional Conduct
  4. (for Ethics CLE credit – a new presentation and a new approach to the topic from me)

  5. 50 Sites, Tips & Gadgets in 50 Minutes – with an all-star panel of Catherine Sanders Reach, Ben Schorr and Jeffrey Taylor

I like Lex Port because I always learn new things. If you are in the St. Louis area (or can make it there), it’s a great use of your time and CLE money. Registration information here.

Hope to see you there.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.