It was a summer of writing and book projects for me. I’ve already pre-announed one of those books, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and other Legal Organizations.

Allison Shields and I have also finished a new book on LinkedIn. It will be called “Make LinkedIn Work for You: A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals.” The manuscript is finished and in the hands of the book designer. The cover has been chosen.

Based on the current timeline, the book should publish via Amazon later this month or in early October. The price is not finalized, but, like my other new book, we wanted the book to be priced very reasonably and be easily available as an ebook.

I’ll talk more about the book soon, but it’s a brand new LinkedIn book for us. Our LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers book is now out of print. We wanted to take a different approach, move away from a short “lessons” format, and focus on strategies that work. The book includes FAQs, tips, and other learnings that we’ve had since we wrote our first book. We’re really pleased with the result and think that anyone who is serious about using LinkedIn to help themselves professionally will be too.

We’ve also explicitly moved away from the “for lawyers” notion, in both the title and the book content. Many people have told us that our LinkedIn strategies and tactics apply to many others other than lawyers, and we wanted to acknowledge that the legal profession is not just about lawyers anymore, if it ever really was.

And, yes, we do want to find some people willing to read the book and write reviews. If that might be you, please reach out to Allison or me.

More details to come in the near future.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Book cover imageSome of my friends have convinced me that, because the manuscript is finished and with the book designer and the cover design has been chosen, it’s time that I announce the upcoming publication of my new book on innovation in law. I tend to be cautious about announcing things, so I’m just “pre-announcing” now.

The book is called “Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and other Legal Organizations.” The only thing that might change is that I’m toying with the idea of putting law departments before law firms. However, I’m inclined to call it done and not overthink things.

Based on the current timeline, the book should publish via Amazon later this month. The price is not finalized, but I want the book priced to sell, not priced like a law book. And I wanted it to be easily available as an ebook.

I’ll talk more about the book soon, but I had been looking for a good practical book that covered innovation in law. I couldn’t find what I wanted. In a sign that I really am a writer at heart, I decided that, if the book didn’t exist, I’d go ahead and write the book I wanted. The book will be one of the first releases from the Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory.

You can preview some of what’s in the book in this FREE PDF download “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law.”

And, yes, I do want to find some people willing to read the book and write reviews. If that might be you, please reach out to me.

One more thing. Yes, there will be another book being published at about the same time. More about that in another post.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

Download button

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Microphone photoBack in school and teaching Entrepreneurial Lawyering at Michigan State University College of Law. U.S. Labor holiday – the traditional marker of the end of summer – now past. Thought it might be a good time to reflect on my summer.

You’ll be hearing more about the two books I wrote over the summer in the next few weeks, so I’ll hold off on those. For a preview of one of the books, you can download a free PDF of my “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law.” HINT: One of my books just might have something to do with this topic.

And many of you have heard about – and responded favorably – to my announcement of my Legal Innovation as a Service offering.

In this post, I wanted to highlight my summer of podcasts, including both The Kennedy-Mighell Report episodes and three recent podcast interviews. I find myself liking just being on a podcast as a guest from time to time, with no responsibility other than to answer questions someone else has to think up, instead of me (or Tom Mighell, of course). I’d be happy to consider a guest spot on your podcast.

In roughly reverse chronological order, here are my podcasts of the summer of 2019.

Lots of good podcast episodes this summer. Whether you are a longtime listener or a first-time podcast listener, I’m sure you’ll find something you’ll like or that will challenge you to think in new ways. Enjoy!

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

Download button

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I had posted recently about my interview as a “LegalTech Legend” in the June 2019 issue of Legal IT Today. At the time, the interview was only available if you downloaded the whole issue as a PDF.

For those wanting a direct link to the article and my comments in the interview, you can now find the article here.

It’s a wide-ranging interview and I’m asked to cover a lot of ground, which was great fun. You’ll get to read some of my story of how I got into the world of legal technology any years ago.

The money quote:

Now is the best time I’ve ever seen to get into LegalTech.

I hope you enjoy the interview. Thanks again to Rob Ameerum at Legal IT Today for making it possible.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

Download button

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Legal Innovation as a Service LogoA while back, I blogged about my plan to create a productized service that I would call “Legal Innovation as a Service.” I’ve now finished work on the offering and am launching it.

I wanted the offering to be simple and target only a few key pain points where I can help forward-looking innovation leaders in law the most. And I wanted to help those leaders be the heroes of their own stories. I also wanted to serve as a behind-the-scenes guide with high standards providing those leaders astute and discreet advice for practical and elegant solutions. Think of it as the “Yoda” approach to help you with the right insight, nudge or push to get you back on the right path.

The result:

Legal Innovation as a Service(TM) (“LIaaS”) is a fresh approach to provide innovation leaders in legal organizations with Just-in-time, Just-enough(TM) guidance at key inflection points in the innovation process. LIaaS consists of pre-scoped, limited, flat fee service offerings to help you get desired feedback or help, move your effort forward, and let you get back to doing what you do best. You select the option you need from the catalog, we work together on that project, and you get quickly back on the road to success and achieving your vision.

  • Jumpstart idea and innovation processes
  • Avoid missteps that will cost time and money
  • Accelerate and make smarter project selections
  • Reality-test projects and get a market-wise second set of eyes on your efforts
  • Get objective evaluation of investment decisions and needed course corrections

A full description of the offering can be found here. I have also published a Legal Innovation as a Service showcase page on LinkedIn for updates and other bonus material. Legal Innovation as a Service is the first release from the Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory. There are several more releases on the roadmap for 2019.

I’ve gotten some great feedback already about Legal Innovation as a Service and I’m excited to see how many people I can help as we try to create successful innovation outcomes in law.

If you want to learn more, discuss Legal Innovation as a Service options, or engage me for a Legal Innovation as a Service package, simply contact me about Legal Innovation as a Service.

Download PDF Brochure

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download buttonDownload my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Cover of Tips PDFI’ve collected and curated a list of my best innovation tips. It’s now available as a free PDF download.

Download button

Everyone working in the innovation field, especially in law, gets stuck from time to time. When you do, you need a guide to help you with some tips, nudges, and insights to get you moving in the right direction. This PDF is designed to do exactly that. There is no need to tough it out and go it alone when just a little help will get you back on the right path. And at the right price – free.Download button

As you might have guessed, I developed this list in connection with a book project that I’m working on. More details on that soon. Very soon, because the manuscript is finished.

+++++++++++++++++

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).Download button

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Summer is the time for reading and I wanted to share a chapter of Tom Mighell and I’s book, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together.

I chose the hot topic of cybersecurity in collaboration tools, an area of risk that is still underestimated by many lawyers and law firms, and one that can bring unwanted exposure to their clients and others who work with them. Tom and I have presented on this topic and it’s one of favorite topics to present. To give you a flavor for our approach, with plenty of insights and practical tips, listen to our podcast episode, “Collaborating with Cybersecurity in Mind.”

Our reading today is from chapter 30 of the book:

Ethics, Security, and Other Practical Issues

Collaboration tools take lawyers into uncharted waters in many ways. In this chapter, we discuss some of the issues that collaboration tools raise in areas of particular concern to lawyers: ethics, confidentiality, and privilege in the practice of law. Even ten years on from the first edition of this book, lawyers are still relative newcomers to using collaboration tools, so we will attempt to reason from analogies with practices and examples that already exist. If bar regulators can understand collaboration tools as evolutionary rather than revolutionary changes and as extensions of processes lawyers already use and know well, they may decide that new types of regulation are not necessary. However, if bar regulators treat these tools as presenting completely new issues requiring completely different approaches, we all could be in for a wild ride.

Lawyers have not yet systematically addressed the ethical and related issues raised by the use of email, the Internet, data storage, and computer technology in general. ABA Formal Opinion 99-413, which states that unencrypted email between lawyer and client does not lose its confidential nature, has been accepted as approving the nonuse of encryption for routine email. However, Formal Opinion 477, issued in 2017, recognizes that some circumstances do warrant the use of “particularly strong protective measures,” including encryption. Because Formal Opinion 477 is not limited to email but to all lawyer communications, lawyers would be well-advised to review it prior to implementing any type of technology, including the collaboration tools we mention in this book.

Unfortunately, if you search through the applicable ethical rules and comments you will not find any references to Slack, service-level agreements, cloud computing, or strong passwords. Although ethics opinions have started to address technology outsourcing, cloud services, and collaboration tools like Google Docs and Office 365, technology continues to change at a rapid pace while ethics opinions lag behind. As a result, when dealing with the ethical issues involved with collaboration tools, you should work from a clear understanding of basic legal ethics principles, take reasonable steps, monitor developments, and look to the technology itself for answers.

In the past, ethical questions involving the use of technology tended to arise and be addressed in the context of marketing, especially on the Internet. Lately, attention is being paid to the area of electronic discovery, particularly the use of metadata. We have also seen activity, largely driven by malpractice insurance carriers and state bar practice management advisors, in the areas of conflict checking, case management, and billing and accounting. Collaboration tools, especially those found online, can raise similar questions. We have seen some ethical guidance on social media and metadata, but not a lot of clarity.

In this chapter, we want to discuss other areas where collaboration tools inevitably will have a large impact: confidentiality, lawyer-client privilege, and what it means to represent a client in the Internet era. Collaboration tools raise difficult issues, but they also often contain the means to address them. If reasonable practices and procedures will be the solution to these problems, how can we start to determine what is reasonable?

Confidentiality and Security

Confidences are easy to keep when few people have access to the information. They are easy to manage when they exist within a physical document that can be locked away in a safe deposit box. Once information is stored in digital form, it becomes easy to copy and move, and much more difficult to secure, especially when it is stored on or accessible via the Internet.

A 2012 amendment to Model Rule 1.6 (Confidentiality of Information) in the Model Rules of Professional Conduct makes it explicit that attorneys must make reasonable efforts to protect against inadvertent disclosure and unauthorized access to information relating to clients. Amendments to the comments provide for a risk based analysis for confidentiality in attorneys’ use of technology and electronic communications.

It’s a fact that the game today is drastically different from when we dealt only with paper. We are not likely to go backward. If you use collaboration technologies in your practice, especially tools that potentially expose your data to outside parties by means of the Internet, you must consider the impact on your ethical obligations of confidentiality. At the same time, this obligation must be interpreted within the context of the real world of computer security.

Over the years, terms like hacking, cracking, and phishing have entered our lexicon, along with social engineering, spoofing, and identity theft. Microsoft and other software vendors routinely release patches for security flaws that would permit someone to access and control a computer. Ransomware, keystroke loggers, Trojan horses, and other malware create a perilous environment for any computer connected to the Internet, even with appropriate protection. Outsiders can access unsecure wireless networks, and packet sniffers, password crackers, and hacking toolkits comprise the arsenal of today’s wrongdoer, increasingly a professional data thief, mysterious government actor, or someone involved in organized crime. Computer security is an ongoing chore and a never-ending battle.

Security is the technology analogue of confidentiality. To be successful and ensure your collaboration tool gets used, the security around the tool must involve a balancing between protection and convenience. To protect something perfectly will all but guarantee that it will be inaccessible and unusable to the collaborator. Consider cartoons where characters lock the door and throw away the key. If your collaboration tools are behind that door, they aren’t of much use to you. On the other hand, maximizing user convenience and access (no passwords or other barriers) effectively will eliminate any protection of the data. Security, and therefore confidentiality, requires finding the right balance.

Security requires a multifaceted approach. Authentication (including multi-factor authentication), authorization, encryption, and other security technologies all play a key role. You also will need to augment these security features with procedures and processes designed to maintain security, which would include not only firm-based procedures but also address the personal dimension of security: strong passwords, user training, and good practices.

As we discussed in Chapter 17, the security of most collaboration tools combines some level of authentication and authorization. You need to be certain the person using the tool is actually the person with permission to do so; this is the authentication component, with usernames and passwords its primary tools. Once someone is authenticated, their access and rights must be limited to only those areas to which they are actually allowed. Users are walled off from data they do not have permission to see, and they are not allowed to access, copy, or change data for which they have no permission. That is where authorization comes into play. It is usually handled by setting network permissions, designating user rights, and placing certain users into groups with defined roles.

Identity management combines authentication and authorization into one seamless process. Once the system verifies your identity, your rights adjust automatically as you move within a tool or from one tool to another. Because lawyers and others work on many different matters and may have different roles in each of those matters, identity management can invisibly tailor a user’s experience so they can access and work on all of their matters, without requiring multiple logins or other annoying procedures. These security measures will help you manage confidential information, maintain ethical boundaries, and log and track access to materials.

It is also important to ensure your online activities are secure. The most common standard for securing a website involves the use of the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)/Transport Layer Security (TLS). You’ll know you’re visiting a site with SSL/TLS when the URL starts with an https:// rather than an http://. Sites with SSL/TLS security should be a requirement for your online collaboration tools, whether you host them or use someone else’s service. Online collaboration tools also often use encryption during transmittal of data. As use of collaboration tools increases, expect all forms of encryption to become more common, including the use of digital certificates.

Finally, your security scenario should have an emphasis on strong passwords and multi-factor authentication. Because longer, complex passwords are harder to crack, a strong password consists of combinations of letters (upper and lower case), numbers, and symbols (for example, b5@2057*JMS). The longer your password the better. The current advice is to use long passphrases that you can remember or use a password manager to generate long random passwords. Some online tools show you the strength of your password when you register, and encourage you to create stronger passwords. Your organization can also enhance security by enforcing strong password requirements. Some organizations use randomly generated passwords created by a fob or token—a small hardware device that is synchronized with a network’s password on a minute-by-minute basis. This approach is a good illustration of multi-factor authentication. That means a combination of something you know (password), something you have (fob or smartphone), or something you are (fingerprint, retina scan, voiceprint, or face identification).

Biometric forms of “passwords,” like fingerprint or even retina scanners, might also come into wider use, partly because of people’s tendency to use weak passwords. Each year, security companies conduct surveys that show that the most commonly used password is something like “123456,” “password,” or “password1,” which only reinforces the need for greater security measures. Some authentication will use location or past behaviors as an additional layer of authentication.

Privilege

Some feel the attorney-client privilege is under attack in the United States. That view may be open for debate, but it is fair to say that the privilege seems to be shrinking and its limits are harder to discern. Use of collaboration tools may only add to the confusion regarding the scope of the attorney-client privilege, but such tools do have the potential to help.

Collaboration tools allow lawyers to tag or label privileged material and protect it electronically, limiting access, tracking use, and providing ways to validate that the material was properly handled. For example, on a litigation extranet, privileged material can be segregated to a certain area of the site, with access tightly controlled. Comments, labels, tags, and access mechanisms can all help in identifying and working with this material.

A related issue is the inadvertent waiver of privilege. Lawyers’ use of technology is fraught with danger and risk, and not just in the area of collaboration tools. Consultants and vendors increasingly have unrestricted access to our computer systems. Further, various types of IT services, hosting, and even license agreements may contain provisions allowing third-party access to data, which can raise privilege and confidentiality issues. Lawyers must pay close attention to these agreements and adequately address any specific concerns they may have.

Other Practical Issues to Watch For
As lawyers use hosted collaboration services more and more often, they will need to keep a watchful eye on potential security issues that arise in the cloud or other hosted environments. Security, disaster recovery, backup, archiving, and redundancy are among the big concerns. Other important issues include loss of data, support levels, response times, warranties, limits on liability, error handling, uptime, and bandwidth requirements. In addition, if you experience problems with your online tools, you will want to have clearly defined escalation procedures, termination and other exit strategies, and requirements for the safe return of your documents and data in a timely manner. You’ll also want to formulate procedures for easing transition to a replacement provider if moving to a new service becomes necessary. Software licenses and hosting agreements in the IT industry are notoriously one-sided in favor of vendors, so you cannot expect the “standard contract” to be adequate. It’s important to note that many of the same issues arise when lawyers host tools on their own computers.

Further, because some online collaboration tools, especially social media, offer a communications channel to non-clients, you run the risk that communications to these individuals may run afoul of your state’s advertising and solicitation rules. These rules might affect what you can say online and whether you need to retain your online materials, apply for preapproval, or comply with other rules that typically apply to advertising or communications directed to non-clients on the Internet.

We’ve only looked at the tip of the iceberg on practical security issues that might arise when developing a collaboration strategy. Many other questions remain. How do electronic discovery rules apply to documents stored in collaboration tools? Will you be obligated to produce materials held in document repositories? How will the question about handling metadata be resolved? What are a lawyer’s obligations for maintaining data in online tools after the project or matter is completed? What happens when vendors offering hosted sites go out of business or lose data? Who is responsible if payments for online services are not made, and the service is suspended?

You’ll also have to deal with maintenance and supervision issues whether you host your collaboration tools internally or use a third-party provider. Who sets and manages user access and permissions? How are updates handled? Who fixes broken links? How long are you required to keep a collaboration site active after the project or matter is completed? And what if clients or lawyers switch firms—how do you transfer the data in your tools to them? We expect the answers to these questions will develop in the coming years.

Last but certainly not least, we must now consider Comment 8 to Rule 1.1 (Competence) of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, which twenty-eight states have adopted as of this writing. It states:

To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer should keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology, engage in continuing study and education and comply with all continuing legal education requirements to which the lawyer is subject. [emphasis added]

Our book is an argument that collaboration tools are indeed a relevant technology, and that lawyers who use collaboration tools in their practice have an obligation to understand both the risks and benefits of using such technologies.

All of these practical issues are manageable, especially if you think about them and plan for them in advance. Your best approach is to treat collaboration tools as something you will be using over the long haul and to start addressing these issues from the outset. You will also need to monitor developments constantly and watch for advice from malpractice carriers as well as opinions and rule changes from bar regulators. With careful planning, you’ll be able to navigate the uncharted waters of collaboration tools with greater confidence.

*****

Want to learn more about collaboration tools and technologies in the legal industry? The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together covers the whole waterfront of ways these tools can help you.

Want to learn more about security in collaboration tools? Tom Mighell and I have presented on this topic and it’s one of our favorite topics. For a preview of how we treat the topic and plenty of tips and insights, listen to our podcast “Collaborating with Cybersecurity in Mind.”

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now available:

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I’m happy to announce that I’ve joined the advisory board of ClariLegal. ClariLegal is an award-winning, cloud-based preferred vendor management platform that improves business outcomes while reducing overall litigation support and ediscovery costs. ClariLegal matches corporate law departments and law firms with preferred vendors through a fast and complete RFP and bidding process, benefitting all parties involved in the process. ClariLegal is privately held and headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

I’ve been helping Cash Butler and his team on an advisory basis for a while now and am excited that we have made the arrangement more public and more formal. The ClariLegal platform has the chance to dramatically reduce and rationalize litigation spending, especially for commodity litigation services, and to accelerate and simplify the RFP process. Very exciting stuff and a great team.

As you may know, ClariLegal is the third legaltech company for which I’m serving on an advisory board. The other two are FoundationLab and TimeSolv.

Would I consider serving on other advisory boards for legaltech companies (or others)?

In the right situation for the right opportunity with the right company.

I like the current mix. ClariLegal is a platform service, which is my favorite approach. FoundationLab is in the design and service productization area, another favorite approach. TimeSolv is in the fascinating area of moving lawyers into the cloud in core areas (and providing some useful extras) and away from old legacy software (e.g., TimeSlips). In many ways, that’s where the rubber meets the road in legaltech. All three companies have great teams and are very innovative in their spaces – a good match for me.

I’m always happy to hear pitches about joining additional advisory boards, but I’m going to be very selective.

Cover photo from issueThe new issue of Legal Business World features me in two articles on topics I’ve been focused on lately – value in legal services and whether the panel convergence process for outside law firms that hasd become popular can, in fact, be used as an innovation driver for both law departments and law firms.

And I’d be lying if I said that I wasn’t excited about my picture being on the cover of the issue.

The issue leads off with my article, “Outside Law Firm Panel Convergence: Innovation Driver or Innovation Destroyer?” You might have read an earlier version of the article here. The article is both a challenge to law departments and law firms to walk the walk and not just talk the talk on innovation, and a guide to using the panel convergence process to drive innovation efforts. The article has been very well-received and I’m designing some service offerings to help firms and departments implement some of my recommendations.

Also in the issue is an interview with me by James Johnson (thank you, James) as part of the ClariLegal Value Series. I get the chance to talk about my insights and perspectives on what “value” in legal services means to me. I mention the large disconnect between what law firms think corporate counsel want and what corporate counsel (and their business clients) really want. Bridging that gap will be the key to success. I end the interview with my usual comment, “There is value in value.”

The rest of the issue is filled with great material, too.

Thank you to Joek Peters and Allard Winterink at Legal Business World for including me and to Cash Butler for inviting me to be part of the Value Series (which has many other great interviews).

[Link to issue]

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now available:

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

A big thank to Rob Ameerum at Legal IT Today for making me part of their LegalTech Legends interview series in the June 2019 issue. I feel quite honored to be included, especially in a global publication.

The interview gave me the chance to to reflect on my experiences and insights into technology and the practice of law over the past many year and to talk about a few topics that I don’t often get the chance to discuss.

You can read the interview by downloading a PDF of the current issue of Legal IT Today.

The issue my interview is in focuses on cybersecurity, arguably the most important day-to-day tech topic for the legal profession.

#LegalIT

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn:

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now available:

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.