CLTI Announcement image

From the press release:

MSU Law’s Center for Law, Technology & Innovation Under New Interim Leadership
Dennis Kennedy will lead MSU College of Law’s Center for Law, Technology & Innovation (CLTI) as its interim director.

Professor Kennedy has been a member of the faculty at MSU Law since 2018, serving as an adjunct professor of law covering topics such as entrepreneurial law, technology, and legal service delivery.

His appointment follows the departure of the previous director, Carla Reyes, in 2020 who led the Center during her time as a professor of law at MSU. The Center’s mission is to develop ways to bring the law to everyone through the work accomplished by law students and other academics in its three complementary arms: the LegalRnD Lab, the Innovation Hub, and the Emerging Technology Research Node.

Professor Kennedy’s vision for the Center moving forward is to build upon the groundwork of his predecessors and to continue the legacy of a program that he’s admired since before he joined the faculty.

Looking forward, I want to continue to raise the bar on performance and increase the CLTI’s visibility, so that any conversation about programs in innovation or technology in law must include Michigan State.

“I want to maintain the momentum of what’s been created because this program is so highly respected and well known,” Professor Kennedy said. “Looking forward, I want to continue to raise the bar on performance and increase the CLTI’s visibility, so that any conversation about programs in innovation or technology in law must include Michigan State.”

The CLTI was founded at MSU nearly a decade ago as the ReInvent Law Program (later renamed Legal RnD) and since its inception it has been enriched by hundreds of alumni who are contributing scholars in the fields of intellectual property and legal technology today.

Thanks to the experiences we are able to offer, our students who emerge from this program are often already known in the legal community and go on to have exciting careers in law, sometimes in areas that haven’t existed before.

Professor Kennedy is eager to continue investing in the Center via the creative alumni and students who are essential to its history and future success. “Thanks to the experiences we are able to offer, our students who emerge from this program are often already known in the legal community and go on to have exciting careers in law, sometimes in areas that haven’t existed before. They’re great ambassadors for Michigan State. Continuing the engagement with current students and alumni is critical to the success of the CLTI.”

Read more about the CLTI.

Looking forward to getting started. And still getting used to being called “Professor.”

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Microphone photoI’ve been doing a lot of podcasting and “Zoomcasting” lately and wanted to collect links to them all in one place in this post.

The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast

Tom and I have done some great shows on some cool topics lately. We have some great stuff planned for the next few months, so it’s a great time to subscribe to the podcast. This list takes you back to the beginning of the pandemic era and is also interesting as a time capsule.

Second Brain Project: Capture, Part 1

Where the Heck Are We? — 2020 Mid-Year Reflections

Eureka! — The Beginnings of Dennis & Tom’s Second Brain Project

Moving from Idea to Action

Top Tips & Tools for Better Online Presentations

Video & Audio Quality Matter — Make Your Remote Work More Professional

Wellness Tech: Self-Care While Sheltering in Place

Good Tech Spending Decisions in Tough Economic Times

A Remote Working Guide to COVID-19 and Beyond

Key Takeaways from TECHSHOW 2020

Coronavirus Looms – Can Technology Replace Travel?

All Things Microsoft! — Tools & Tips for Lawyers with Ben Schorr

Guest Appearances

Making the Most of Your LinkedIn Profile with Dennis Kennedy and Allison Shields

TSLP Podcast #11: From Mobile to Desktop, My Conversation with Entrepreneur Dennis Kennedy!

Law Insights with Bob Ambrogi and Dennis Kennedy 7.1 (Video)

Tips and Tools to Maximize Your Personal Productivity (Video)

Legal Tech: Where to Spend and How to Leverage During COVID-19 (Video)

Working Remotely During COVID-19 (Video)

Check them out! Lots of good stuff in this batch. And all free.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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Legal Innovation as a Service Logo

Corporate legal departments and law firms have reached the point in the pandemic where they must start to move beyond triage to the first steps to moving forward.

The path from where we are to where we want to go starts with a solid understanding of where we actually are.

And there is no time like the present.

The path from where we are to where we want to go starts with a solid understanding of where we actually are.

For forward-looking legal innovation leaders and top-level executives (especially in corporate law departments) who must evaluate existing and planned innovation projects and portfolios quickly, independently, and economically, I am offering LIaaS assessment services so that they can confidently make fast and prudent decisions.

I’m now featuring two of my LIaaS (Legal Innovation as a Service) offerings targeting at the assessment phase:

A. Reality Check – Review current or proposed innovation project portfolio and assess whether what you are doing makes sense in the real world (US$7,500)

B. Second Set of Eyes – Thorough review of your current or proposed innovation project portfolio that digs deeper into projects with a more detailed analysis (US$15,000)

More details here or call me at 734-926-5197.

Download my free 57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law PDF.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

The Biggest Disconnect in the Legal Industry?
(COVID-19 Version)

We seem to be living in a time when what is most important today already seems like old news tomorrow. It’s difficult, on so many levels. The seeming comfort of a “return to normal” appeals more than the discomfort of change and innovation. However, either/or is a false choice, and we all know that.

Like you, I’ve spent many hours on online videoconferences in the last few months. Since I retired from Mastercard, my Zoom calls have not been so much about specific work issues, but with groups of legal innovators—in-house counsel, outside counsel, legal tech vendors—intimately involved in the efforts to cope with the current crises.

What can you do, today, to bridge the biggest connect in the legal industry with your best clients?

This vantage point has given some unique insights. The title of this article refers to the most important one.

I found myself using the phrase “the biggest disconnect in the legal industry” a few years ago. On my recent Zoom calls, the comments that led me to use this term have reached a crescendo.

I routinely hear outside counsel say that they wish in-house counsel talked to them more about what they need so they could collaborate better. At the same time, I hear in-house counsel say that they wished their outside counsel talked to them more about what new things they could bring to the table to help them so they could collaborate better. That, simply put, is the disconnect.

AND THOSE CONVERSATIONS STILL AREN’T HAPPENING!

When I ask why people are not making the initial contact, I hear a lot of reasons: waiting for the other group to make the first move, too busy, too afraid, and many more. Mostly, I get the sense that lawyers don’t want to admit (or show) that they might not have answers for everything, even in these times. One word: fear.

I see regularly in surveys of Chief Legal Officers that the most common answer to the question “What innovation did you outside counsel bring to you?” is “none.”

In a recent Zoom call, a large group was asked if they had a vendor who had delighted them recently. There was one answer. Someone’s outside counsel had called and told them that they did not need to pay invoices until 2021 if they didn’t want to. While that would have delighted me, other law firm representatives on the call said they didn’t see how they could do that. None indicated that they had reached out to clients in innovative ways.

On the same call, in-house counsel spontaneously started complaining about all their outside firms sending them emails about how to revise and renegotiate “force majeure” clauses. Although there was laughter, there was a sense of great frustration about firms guessing what in-house counsel might think was important rather than talking with them. If you are an in-house counsel trying to help your company survive the current crises and thrive on the other side, force majeure clauses are not at the top of your list.

In one sense, the threshold for outside counsel innovation efforts is quite low and the opportunity to differentiate from other firms is there for the taking, simply by taking initiative. In another sense, however, the examples illustrate the desire of in-house counsel to see their outside firms take the lead in innovation and technology initiatives and their disappointment with the perceived lack of leadership.

Another example of a legal technology “solution” that outside counsel like to advocate is “contract lifecycle management.” Yes, there is a need, but those projects are not at the top of the in-house priority list, are nightmarishly complex to implement, and involve many moving parts within a company’s existing IT and procurement structure.

If, instead, the innovation process ended with a pilot project of a dashboard of highly relevant data, an expertise locator, or a list of places where routine legal review could be eliminated, you would have delighted in-house counsel. Each of those address pain points, solve business problems, and are easy experiments. Each of these also illustrate how you have come in to listen, discover and suggest some options that have worked elsewhere, not to sell a pre-conceived innovation “solution.” And they provide value to the client.

And, if you initiate them, your firm is likely to stay on the panel list when the inevitable panel convergence efforts begin again.

Many lawyers hate to “sell.” Most in-house counsel hate to be “sold to.” The good news is that pitching innovation efforts should not involve selling in the classic sense. It should consist of many of your best lawyering skills: asking good questions, active listening, investigating, getting to the core problem, looking at options, and patience. You want to understand what the client wants before you jump in with a solution.

While there are many definitions of innovation, most of them emphasize “customer-focused” or “customer-centered” problem solving and a focus on desired outcomes. Your client has the problem to solve. Your goal, and your role, are to help your client solve their problem and eliminate their pains and achieve their gains.

Think Yoda, not Superman.

The client does not need or want you to swoop in and save the day with these initiatives, or for you to try to prove that you are “the smartest person in the room,” a term in-house counsel do not use as a compliment when talking about outside counsel. You can do that when handling important legal work. Instead, clients want to be the heroes of their own innovation stories. They want a guide with a plan to help them win the prize while avoiding disaster. Think Yoda, not Superman.

And, if you initiate these efforts, you and your firm are likely to stay on the panel list when the inevitable panel convergence efforts begin again soon.

With that in mind, what approaches work best when discussing innovation projects or processes with a client?

1. Bring it Up First. Since outside firms are known for NOT bringing innovation ideas to corporate counsel, simply initiating the conversation might be a differentiator for you. If you put innovation in the context of improving the relationship, controlling or cutting legal spend, or a new benefit for key clients, you will have a winning combination. Offer to listen. Offer not to charge for the meeting. If I weren’t retired and an outside counsel came to me and offered to have this kind of meaningful conversation at no charge, I would probably insist that they bill me for the meeting at the end because I perceived the value of the conversation and appreciated the effort. Do whatever it takes to get on your client’s calendar. My bet is that you will be surprised by the receptivity you find.

2. Understand Your Client’s Internal Goals and Objectives. In-house counsel and law departments have annual objectives and goals. Understand what those are and make the part of the equation. Visible achievement of annual goals will always be a desired gain for your client. As an example, do not assume that a US client’s goal is to craft a great “we care” Black Lives Matter message; the real focus is on meaningful action steps and progress. That’s here your assistance and guidance become valuable.

3. Pitch Pilots. Upwards of 90% of innovation projects fail or drastically change from the initial concept. That’s a good thing. It’s part of the innovation and start-up process. The more pilots, the better. Pilots give you and the client prototypes to test, examples of possible projects to share with others, and quick wins that build momentum. Pilots show off your creativity, business acumen, and understanding of client goals.

4. Bring the Whole Team. Get the right teams talking, especially in panel convergence presentations. If a law department has a Chief Innovation Officer or innovation lead, they will want to meet and talk with their counterparts. Your client will want to hear from the people who can answer their specific questions about process improvement, project management, productization of services, and other innovation initiatives. From my experience, in-house counsel does not want a return of the days when a senior partner unfamiliar with the details is in charge of pitching a service offering he clearly does not understand.

Innovation initiatives from outside counsel have moved from nice-to-have to must-have. Law departments are looking for help to show innovation results to their C-suites and meet corporate and department goals and objectives. Increasingly, company survival is at issue and legal budget and personnel reductions are likely on the horizon. Think about it: if you were a general counsel under orders to cut costs, wouldn’t you try to keep your own team together and reduce spend on outside counsel who do not bring anything new to the table?

Let me re-emphasize one key point. In-house counsel will be looking for guides who give them plans to achieve what they need and remain the heroes of their own stories. If you can provide that, you will cement long-term client relationship and open the doors to new legal work as a preferred law firm and a valued partner. What can you do, today, to bridge the biggest connect in the legal industry with your best clients?

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This post is part of my #blogfirst approach to writing and publishing articles.

Download my free 57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law PDF.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Joanna Goodman recently asked me for some tips on how firms can go about balancing the need to control costs and manage the expectations of their partners and staff with investing in innovation to retain and win business and maintain competitive advantage as lockdown is lifted.

What should firms’ (especially mid-sized firms) priorities be for driving and leveraging innovation?

A few of my tips appeared in her great new article, “The Great Leap Forward,” in the Law Society Gazette.

I wanted to share all of the tips I came up with in this blog post. It’s part of my #blogfirst approach to writing and publishing articles.

Portfolio – Innovation efforts must be looked at as a portfolio. As in your financial investments, diversifying across asset classes, risk/reward, and investment horizons becomes essential. If you invest only in “low-risk” innovation categories and projects, you will not be diversified and your risks will actually increase and outcomes, for you and your clients, will not improve.

Client involvement – Innovation success is directly related to the amount of client involvement. Period. Firms that don’t talk with clients in depth often create products, services and improvement that are not what their clients want. Every survey of chief legal officers shows that clients are looking at you to initiate those conversations right now. Taking this approach can be a big competitive advantage for mid-sized firms.

Scientific method – Innovation involves experiments, testing, hypotheses, evidence-gather, learning from mistakes and missteps, and the like. That’s the scientific method we all learned in school. Innovation is not magic – it’s a practice and a discipline that can be learned and repeated.

Guidance – Our current crises have stressed our assumptions, our efforts, and ourselves. Projects that made sense at the start of the year likely no longer makes sense as conceived. At the same time, everyone involved in them are having difficulty seeing the bigger picture and the changes needed. Getting some fresh eyes from the outside – clients or others – will make a world of difference. A reality check can be a big help.

Retention – Innovators want to work on cool projects that show results. If those dry up and salary cuts occur, your innovators will be looking to leave the first chance they can. If you can put your innovators on projects that excite them, even it’s only one or two of them, your chances of retaining them will increase dramatically.

Microniche practice areas – If I were to suggest one area that mid-sized firms take a hard look at, it would be developing new cross-departmental microniche practices, especially those that anticipate where you clients are looking to be in a few years in technology, supplier and customer relationships, e-commerce, a changing legal and regulatory environment, and much more. Be the guide and the partner, with your clients’ biggest business needs on your radar. Yes, that means talking with clients on a regular basis.

De-risking – There’s a term I like and use a lot lately in connection with innovation efforts. It’s called “de-risking.” It combines both the portfolio approach and scientific method. How can you use evidence, testing, and flexibility to make innovation projects more likely to succeed? There are approaches out there that help you do this.

Three stages – Most firms are looking at three stages to getting through the current crises- surviving, restarting, and thriving in a new future. Obviously, most of the attention is being focused on the first two stages. Innovation, especially incremental innovation and process improvements, is certainly possible in the first two stages. However, your most important innovation efforts need to be directed at the third stage. Unfortunately, that’s where many firms are currently looking to drastically reduce or eliminate efforts. The negative consequences are both predictable and avoidable. Firms need to show clients how smart they really are and that they plan to be along for the long haul.

There is so much innovation opportunity in the mid-sized firm space! Concentrate on a few of these and see what you can accomplish. Let me know if these help you.

Download my free 57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law PDF.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

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Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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Chapter 11. Diversity is Essential

There are times, usually when I’m in a room full of white men who look and think in the same ways, that the idea I’ll discuss in this chapter is the most controversial opinion I can state in the innovation setting. However, it’s my core belief.

Diversity, in and of itself, is not only a good thing in innovation efforts, it’s essential to success.

Really, it is.

And I don’t mean paying lip service to diversity by saying we all might look the same and come from similar backgrounds or all have legal educations, but we have “diversity of perspectives.” Ask someone outside that narrow band of perspectives how diverse that band is. It’s almost always a narrow slice.

I spent many years at Mastercard, by any definition a global company. I was in conversations and meetings with people from all over the world. I always gained fresh insights from new perspectives and approaches other than my own. It always surprised my how quickly the assumptions you made about how a successful product in one country would be just as successful in another country would be brought into question when you included people from the second country. It’s great to get a challenging dose of reality.

PRO TIP: Take a look around the room at your next meeting. And the one after that. And the one after that.

I’ve lately been recommending Caroline Criado Perez’s book, Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men, which among many other things, points out the actual physical dangers of not including women in design and scientific research, all based on actual data.

The risk of taking a non-diverse approach is groupthink. Groupthink has given a long history of bad results, including ill-conceived wars. Looking to avoid it by design is a great way to move innovation efforts toward success.

No need to just take my opinion. There are many studies that support the proposition that simply diversify your team by gender, race, nationality, and other factors leads to better results.

I now like a team where the mix of people makes me feel just a little bit at unease because it creates more energy, forces me to listen and learn, and helps me feel what it’s like to be different. All of these things stimulate creativity and innovation.

Are you checking on a regular basis how diverse your formal and informal teams are? Is someone missing from the table who could give you real-world feedback on your assumptions? Are you hearing all the voices that need to be heard?

PRO TIP: Take a look around the room at your next meeting. And the one after that. And the one after that.

Buy the book on Amazon.

Download my free 57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law PDF.

Learn more about my innovation services and Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

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Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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One of my new collaboration efforts is the Exponential Law Community. I invite you to learn more about it and join here.

In one of first big experiments, Mike Cappucci, Dean Khialani, Shellie Reid, and I did livestream Zoom session in which we applied the FoundationLab / Exponential Law Community idea validation framework to the Community’s first Challenge of the Month. It will give you a great (live and unrehearsed) illustration of how the methodology and process works. A big thank you for Shellie for joining in and representing the “voice of the customer” and also bringing her own ideas to the table.

Our goal was to:

Let you observe how we apply our systematic idea validation framework to:

(a) establish an idea statement,
(b) articulate the core beliefs of the idea,
(c) identify the riskiest assumptions behind the idea, and
(d) prepare a plan to gather evidence supporting our core beliefs about the proposed solution.

Our Challenge of the Month was:

For recent law school graduates who have had their bar exams for this summer postponed, and perhaps their future employment delayed or terminated, where could they deploy their skills to both create value in the world and continue to learn and grow as legal professionals? What product or service opportunities does this challenge present?

What was most interesting to me was how much we worked on questioning our initial assumptions about both graduates and desired skills.

I wanted to share the final idea statement we settled on for our proposed service.

For recent law school graduates who want to build a baseline set of meta skills that prepare them for effective practice, we are creating a matchmaking platform that connects recent law school graduates with organizations who have micro-projects that enable students to gain desired meta skills, so that they have a headstart on their peers to hit the ground running with regard to the practice of law.

We decided that our most important assumption/hypothesis about this service for which we had the least evidence was:

We believe that law school graduates would be willing to take on a micro-projects outside of the legal field the summer after they graduate.

And we ended up with a great way to test and collect evidence on that hypothesis (not a survey) . . . but I’ll let you watch the video for that.

Note that we see innovation as a set of stages. Most of the time, people stay in the ideation stagee, but the next stage, validation, is where my head is at these days. From ideas to actions.

We’d love to hear your feedback, comments and suggestions – and for you to try to join us and try to participate in the next Challenge of the Month. Your suggested challenges are welcomed.

The Exponential Law community is built around the idea that legal professionals can better leverage their skills, knowledge and experience to deliver legal value at scale. Through the use of design, exponential technologies and exponential business models, lawyers of today have access to infinite leverage. Our community is comprised of legal professionals who understand that power, and are working to find new ways to support clients, and dramatically improve their own lives.

Join the community now!

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

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Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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I taught two law school classes this past semester: “Delivering Legal Services” at Michigan State University College of Law and a brand new courses called “Legal Technology Literacy and Leadership” at the University of Michigan Law School. To put it mildly, the pandemic presented some challenges for both classes, but the students impressed me with their effort, persistence, resilience, and creativity.

I have finished reading and grading their final papers and, wow, was I impressed. Even without the challenges, their work was so good – well beyond my expectations.

I want to help these students, whose immediate career plans have been thrown way off track, and find ways to share these papers with the legal tech and legal innovation world.

I have a few ideas, but I want to reach out to the legal publishing world. If you are a publisher of law-related articles who who be interested in publishing some of these papers, please reach out to me and I can get you information and introductions.

Even if you aren’t a publisher, you’ll want to read through the paper topics to see the creativity and sophistication that these students brought to their final papers.

Legal Technology Literacy and Leadership (Michigan)

The assignment in this class was to identify a technology or innovation that the student thought was important and show their understanding of the implications in law, with the idea of illustrating how the student might leverage tech and innovation into leadership roles.

The student papers cover:

  • Intersection of Tech and Disability Rights
  • Contact Tracing Implications for Black Communities
  • Managing and Assessing Remote Working Attorneys
  • New Competition for Traditional BigLaw
  • SupTech (Supervisory Technologies) for Regulators
  • Approaches for Increasing Arbitration Efficiency for In-house Law Departments
  • Facilitation of E-Litigation in Japan
  • NewLaw & The Future of theLegal Profession
  • Virtual Data Rooms and Their Impact on Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Early Learnings from Covid-19’s Impact on Litigation and the Legal Workplace
  • Strategic Technology Plans for NGOs
  • The Uses and Challenges of Adopting AI and Legal Tech Tools Within In-House Departments
  • Blockchain and the Legal Industry
  • The Future of Algorithms in Probable Cause

Delivering Legal Services (Michigan State)

In this class, the students come up with ideas for a new legal (or law-related) service and develop the ideas into a plan for offering the new service, including integration of process improvement techniques. They do a pitch proposal and a paper presenting their business plan for the new service.

The student papers cover:

  • Innovation/tech/efficiency consulting for mid-sized and large law firms
  • Providing tenant legal services through an nonprofit organization
  • Subscription-based legal service that helps small and large health care entities buy and sell health care practices
  • Document automation tool for judges and court systems
  • Targeted business law services for cannabis industry
  • Parental rights resource center
  • Targeted legal services for women provided by women
  • Gamification and other online approaches applied to estate planning services
  • Customizable juror selection app
  • Online legal and related services for expectant mothers
  • Cloud-based contract negotiation tool for in-house legal departments
  • Inner city entrepreneurial legal and business assistance program
  • AI-based contract analytics tools

I think that you will agree that these students more than rose to the challenges of this semester and the great uncertainty that they face in their current situations. There’s so much creative talent in these students.

Please help me get the word out about their ideas and their work. You can email me here.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

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Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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In The Sign of the Four, Arthur Conan Doyle writes this exchange between Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson:

I crave for mental exaltation. That is why I have chosen my own particular profession,—or rather created it, for I am the only one in the world.”

“The only unofficial detective?” I said, raising my eyebrows.

“The only unofficial consulting detective,” he answered.

Holmes expands:

I examine the data, as an expert, and pronounce a specialist’s opinion. I claim no credit in such cases. My name figures in no newspaper. The work itself, the pleasure of finding a field for my peculiar powers, is my highest reward.

I substituted “innovator” for “detective” and realized that I had found where I want to be and probably am well on my well to becoming.

I took a trip quick to Google to look for a definition of “consulting innovator.” This morning, my LinkedIn profile was the top result. That’s promising.

As I try to define and evolve what I have in mind, the quotes from Holmes feel about right.

Other descriptions I’ve been working with include:

Discreet advice and guidance with practical and elegant solutions

Astute behind-the-scenes guidance with very high standards

You can see I’ve been playing with the words guidance, discreet, astute, and elegant, which those of you familiar with Sally Hogshead’s work might recognize.

Some people have told me that they think the reference to Sherlock Holmes is a bit too obscure. However, Holmes fans get it immediately. And I think that’s OK for now.

As Holmes would say, “the game is afoot!”

Let me know your reactions.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

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In two online workshops (April 16 and April 22), I’ll be helping Mike Cappucci and Dean Khialani of FoundationLab (I’m on their Advisory Board) facilitate a free virtual workshop called “Beyond Ideas.”

If you are an innovator in law or have some great ideas that you want to move on the next stage, I encourage you to join us.

I have described innovation as both a discipline and a practice. Foundationlab’s approach gives you a way to systematically move from the idea stage, where most of the focus seems to be and where we too often get stuck, to the validation and testing phase, which is essential if you want to de-risk your innovation efforts and increase your odds of finding and funding winning projects.

Here’s the description:

Beyond Ideas: discovering opportunities for legal professionals in the wake of COVID-19.

DESCRIPTION

The world has been turned upside down by the outbreak of COVID-19. All industries have been and will continue to be affected. How will this global pandemic shape the future of the legal industry? And more importantly, what NEW opportunities will the evolving environment present to the legal professional?

WORKSHOP GOALS

(1) Learn how to advance an idea from its genesis to its viability as a business opportunity with greater certainty, in an uncertain time.

(2) Collaborate with peers from around the globe to move beyond ideas, and begin validating new opportunities for legal professionals.

(3) In a global economic slowdown, gain the confidence to use this newfound space to be highly creative.

WHAT TO EXPECT

This immersive, virtual workshop will push you beyond brainstorming ideas. Over the course of two, 90 minute sessions – you will:

  • Learn to shape your ideas and identify the areas of greatest risk.
  • Be exposed to experiment design as a method for testing your ideas.
  • Develop a baseline understanding of the validation journey, designed to gather evidence and mitigate risk at each stage.

This workshop will span TWO 90 minute sessions: April 16 @1pm EST and April 22 @1pm EST. Register here.

#beyondideas #exponentiallaw #foundationlab

It should be both productive and fun. Many of us have tons of new ideas these days. This workshop might be just what you need to take your best ideas on the road to reality.

Register here.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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