On February 15, 2003, I started this blog with a line from Babylon 5:

G'Kar

And so it begins . . .
I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (https://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

Last year, my blog definitely had some demands:

It can be a little difficult being the parent of a teenage blog. The sixteenth was a little tricky. Not unexpectedly, my blog felt that a new car (not a used one) was the appropriate present. I think I was able to finesse this request by saying that if my blog found a car insurance company that would issue an auto policy for a blog, we’d consider it. So far, so good.

Because I don’t make a fuss about my own birthday (this blog was an early birthday present to me in 2003), I do make a fuss over the blog’s birthday. In fairness, my blog pressures me to do that. And it demands a blogiversary or blawgiversary post for each year, even though I feel I’m the only one who uses the term “blawgiversary” anymore.

As is my tradition, I usually have offered a small gift to my readers each year. If you will patiently read to the bottom of this post, you will find two small tokens of appreciation. My blog, on the other hand, likes gifts and has a seemingly endless need for attention, approval, audience, and gifts. It can be a trial to have a sullen teenaged blog around the house.

It’s been a good year for DennisKennedy.Blog, even though writing and publishing two books definitely took some writing time away from blogging. I wanted to highlight a few posts:

SPECIAL BLAWGIVERSARY OFFERS:

1. FREE PDF Download of 57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law.

2. Until February 23, 2020, the price on the Kindle version of my book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law, has been reduced to US$9.99 (51% off) in honor of this blog’s 17th blawgiversary.

If you like this blog, you can always “Buy Me a Coffee.”

Finally, my blog is pestering me to add a link to the Amazon Wishlist it has set up for its birthday. If that’s some that appeals to you, contact me and I’ll get you shipping address info. With that, my teenaged blog seems a bit happier.

All the best and I’m hoping for another great year of blogging.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

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Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Yesterday, I posted some highlights of recent reviews of my new book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law. Today, I thought it was only fair to post a couple of reviews of the even newer book I wrote with Allison Shields, Make LinkedIn Work for You: A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals (available on Amazon).

From Niki Black’s review on Above the Law:

In this book, co-authored by Dennis Kennedy and Allison Shields, you’ll learn everything you need to know about using LinkedIn as a legal professional. There’s something for everyone in this book, regardless of whether you’ve been on Linkedin for years or whether it’s a new endeavor.

Trust me on this. As someone whose been on LinkedIn for more than a decade now and who has over 221,000 followers, I like to think I’ve got a pretty good handle on using LinkedIn. Even so, I learned about quite a few new features that I had been previously unaware of.

At the outset, the authors offer the following very important advice: if you don’t know what you’re trying to accomplish on Linkedin, you’ll have no idea whether the time you spend on LinkedIn is worth it. That’s why, as they explain, it’s so important to determine your goals in order to get the most out of LinkedIn:

“What are you hiring LinkedIn to do?”…For example, if you are “hiring” LinkedIn to help you find a job, you will use it differently than if you are hiring LinkedIn to help you fill an open position. If you want to hire LinkedIn to find new local clients for your law practice, you will do something different than if you want to hire it to help you find speaking opportunities. Our sense is that LinkedIn will work best for most lawyers and other legal professionals if they hire it to help them create, manage, and care for their network of referrers and potential referrers of business.” –

Also:

What I love about Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Guide for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals is that it forces you to think strategically. Like many other lawyers, I am reasonably good at keeping up my profile and I have a wealth of connections, which I do seek to expand on a semi-regular basis. But I am pretty terrible at participating regularly and with a plan.

As Allison and Dennis say, “The book focuses on the three parts of your LinkedIn presence that you must understand well: Profiles, Connections, and Participation.” So you can see why the book appealed to me. I needed (and got) great education on the “participation” building block that was eluding me – and I’ll bet many of you reading this are in the same leaky raft.

Things I learned about (and needed to): How to bring LinkedIn into the real world, how to nurture the LinkedIn social media network, ways to make prospective clients turn into actual clients, how to convert my Twitter followers into LinkedIn connections, and the best kind of posts (and ideas for repurposing content and attracting positive attention by using particular kinds of post).

There are a lot of gold nuggets in this book. If you know you are not using LinkedIn as effectively as you want to, give yourself the gift of this book! – Sharon Nelson

I encourage you to read the book. It gives you many, many of the practical insights and tips from what we’ve learned about LinkedIn over many years, a strong focus on strategy and leveling up your use of LinkedIn, and our helpful three essential building blocks framework.

Purchase the book here.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

I’ve been getting some good reviews and nice comments about my new book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and Other Legal Organizations. TOday seemed like a good day to post a few of them.

It’s practical and hands-on. It’s also encyclopaedic and full of wise observations in feel and tone, rather than didactic and pushing home one particular view.

Yet, for the super-experienced Jedi masters of the mystical force known as ‘I’ – this will also act as a useful bedside book, acting perhaps as a touchstone for their own thoughts on the subject.

Overall then, I’d recommend this book. It may not change your world, but if you’re on the I-path then it may well become your trusty companion and a source of practical encouragement. – Richard Tromans

Bottom line, the book is chock full of useful and practical tips based on Dennis’ years of experience as an actual in-house counsel. The strength of the book is that it combines Kennedy’s knowledge about technology and innovation with his real work experience.

I used to have a partner who was fond of saying never identify a problem without offering a solution. The strength of the book is that it is true to this principle. It is a comprehensive look at innovation in the legal space—and more broadly, how to better practice law now and in the future. – Steve Embry

I personally enjoyed the Chapters covering techniques to optimize lawyer engagement; requests to make if you are put in charge; the use of Innovation Committees and Advisory Board; techniques to avoid with lawyers; the value proposition canvas tool; design sprints; the in-depth guidance on risk alignment and breaking through the many innovation barriers – as these are not topics that I find covered in books of this nature.

Finally, the last section including the 57 substantive tips and the recommended reading and website resources will keep me and I suspect any reader engaged for some time! – Patrick McKenna

I’ve been really apprehensive about starting my new job] but picked up a copy of Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law and already feel I have more of a frame to work with. It’s been such a helpful guide for someone who has spent a lot of my career thinking ‘I’m sure we must be able to do this BETTER’ but not really having the platform to help guide change.

Thank you very much for writing it, I’m sure I’ll be returning to it frequently over the coming months

El libro cubre de una forma bastante completa las diferentes aristas de la innovación legal con un enfoque bien práctico. Recomiendo mucho este libro para interesados en tema y mas aún para personas involucradas en proyectos que busquen generar disrupción en servicios legales.[The book covers quite completely the different aspects of legal innovation with a very practical approach. I highly recommend this book for interested parties and even more so for people involved in projects that seek to disrupt legal services.]

Your new book is coming in handy! – new law firm Chief Innovation Officer

I’ve been very pleased so far with the great reaction to the book, but, knowing me, I probably won’t be happy until everyone in the field of legal innovation has read it.

If you want a sample of the book’s content, download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

The book is a product of Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

It’s been a while since I pointed to recent episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast. Tom and I have been on a run of really good episodes (IMHO), so it seemed like a good time to do a post about those episodes and invite you to take a listen to the show.

Recent Episodes

Look for more great episodes in the future (I already know what the next one is!). If you have an idea for a show topic or a question you’d like us to answer on a future podcast, let us know. We have a special phone number for you to call in your question, leave a voicemail and possibly hear it on the show – (720) 441-6820.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory’s LabNotes is my new daily posting of links I’ve found to items on legal innovation, legal technology, and other topics of interest to me. It resides on the Paper.Li platform. A big thank to Ken Grady who helped me see the potential of this platform and answered some of my questions about it – his “Daily Lean Gazette” can be found here.

Paper.Li provides a number of distribution options. I prefer the simple daily web newspaper approach because I don’t want to burden anyone’s inbox with yet another email newsletter. However, I plan to post updates with links to daily web newspaper on the Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory LinkedIn showcase page (which you can see and follow here) and tweet links to the web newspaper on a regular basis.

It’s an experiment and I welcome your feedback. If you are already trying Paper.Li or start to use it after reading this, I’d enjoying hearing your reactions and getting your tips on how to use it effectively.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Quick reminder: January is Innovation Ideas Month at DennisKennedy.Blog. And I have some special offers from now until the end of the day on January 31, 2020.

As part of my 20/20/2020 offering until the end of January, I’m doubling the number of ideas I offer in my Idea Sampler Pack from ten to twenty and keeping the price at $2,500. It’s a great way to learn how I can help you generate more and better ideas.

Too many innovation efforts in law get off to poor starts because there simply aren’t enough ideas to consider. That’s where I can help improve your chances of successful innovation outcomes in law and reduce your risk of considering too few options. Email me or call me at 734-926-5197.

The 20/20/2020 offer ends January 31. Also available: 20% discount on bundles of two or more Legal Innovation as a Services packages booked on or before January 31. Another simple, quick and reasonably-priced way to reduce your risk in innovation projects through focused just-in-time, just-enough help at key points in your innovation process.Email me or call me at 734-926-5197.

Offers end soon. Looking forward to working with you.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Since I retired from Mastercard, I’ve gotten a lot of questions from people who want to know what I’ll be doing next. I like to phrase the question as, “What is DennisKennedy.Next?”

I’ve had the luxury of having some time to think about this and get the opinions of some amazing people. I’ve also had the chance to experiment in a few areas and do some adjunct teaching, book writing, and other projects.

The path gradually became clearer and what I thought was what I wanted to do in five years coalesced as something to do now and not to wait. It’s time to go to work. I’ve blogged about the idea and given a bit of a preview here.

This post marks the official launch of Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory. To the extent titles are meaningful, I’ll be the Executive Director and Chief Innovation Officer.

The mission of Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory is to help forward-looking legal organizations innovate.

The lab will also be the umbrella for most of my activities and services and will evolve as I evolve. Most importantly, it will become the vehicle through which I do collaborations on joint projects. Call 734-926-5197 or contact Dennis Kennedy

Frequently Asked Questions.

How would you describe Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory in 20 words or less?

A “think tank” focused on the future of the legal industry offering services, products, collaborations and research & development.

What problems does Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory solve for its clients?

Clients get access to Dennis Kennedy’s expertise, expertise and network to address both targeted and focused legal technology and innovation roadblocks and slowdowns, and broader, big-picture legal technology, innovation, R&D, and business model strategies to move them to the next stage. I’ve found that these kinds of problems, which can seem insurmountable, often are only sticking points that need a just-in-time, just enough change of perspective or intervention to get your projects moving on to the next phase.

Why use Dennis for this assistance?

Dennis is Yoda. – Jordan Furlong

I’ve been very well known in these fields for many years. You and others can certainly learn what I’ve learned over my long career, but you can’t do it quickly and you don’t have the same breadth of experience, context, and perspective I have. If you are a forward-looking legal organization that needs some practical help, working with me will make sense.

What areas does Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory cover?

The web page for Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory describes the areas in more detail, but here’s a quick overview:

1. Services

2. Research & Development

  • Custom Projects
  • Productization and Product Development
  • Big picture topics (megatrends, business models, access to justice, learning from change in adjacent professions)

3. Education

4. Collaborations and joint projects

Do you have some examples?

Legal Innovation as a Service, LegalTech Vendor Advisory Services, and Panel Convergence Advisory Services are examples of my own efforts to “productize” my own services.

Other recent examples:

  • Market and business model assessment and advice for potential new legal products
  • Brainstorming and advice for access to justice expungement clinic initiative
  • Advice on designing new conferences and improving conference models
  • Feedback on new legal services and products
  • Idea generation and testing

How do I hire Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory?

That’s the question I wanted to hear. Call 734-926-5197 or contact Dennis Kennedy

Is this all you will doing going forward?

As you probably know, I’m teaching some legal technology and innovation classes at both the University of Michigan Law School and the Michigan State University College of Law. I’m also exploring a limited and part-time law practice that will probably need to be done on an of counsel basis with an innovative technology firm. I want to build a digital transformation law practice, do some arbitration and mediation of tech disputes, and some limited scope infotech transaction law work (licenses, Open Source, cloud, new technologies).

How do I learn more?

Start with the Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory page. I’ve also created a Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory LinkedIn showcase page for regular updates. And I’m doing a regular Paper.Li daily links collection called Kennedy Idea Propulsion Laboratory LabNotes. I’d also recommend my book and the free 57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law PDF. You might also follow me on Twitter art @denniskennedy. And there’s still time until January 31, 2020 to take advantage of the 20/20/2020 special offers.

I’m looking forward to working with you. Call 734-926-5197 or contact Dennis Kennedy

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

In yesterday’s Delivering Legal Services class at Michigan State University College of Law, I introduced the approach of using mind mapping and brainstorming as tools to generate ideas. We did some initial experimentation before we launch into some target design thinking sessions over the next few weeks. The blackboard photo shows what we generated in about 15 minutes to start toward creating a new legal service. The exercise was a bit of pump priming.

The class reminded me how much I enjoy idea-generation.

And that reminded me how I needed to remind you that January is Innovation Ideas Month for me – and, very possibly, for you.

As part of my 20/20/2020 offering until the end of January, I’m doubling the number of ideas I offer in my Idea Sampler Pack from ten to twenty and keeping the price at $2,500. It’s a great way to learn how I can help you with ideas. And I’m primed.

Too many innovation efforts in law get off to poor starts because there simply aren’t enough ideas to consider. That’s where I can help improve your chances of successful innovation outcomes in law.

The 20/20/2020 offer ends January 31. Also available: 20% discount on bundles of two or more Legal Innovation as a Services packages booked on or before January 31.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Like this post? Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Our friends at the Legal Talk Network sent Tom Mighell and I the stats on episode downloads of our podcast in 2019. I wanted to share those because it will give new listeners some good suggestions on where to start. Remember that the stats are for the whole year and that puts the most recent shows at a disadvantage. You might start with the newest ones and then work your way through the most popular ones.

The Top Ten – 2019

1. What’s Your Favorite Cool Tool?

2. Best Practices for Measures and Metrics in Law Firms

3. The Future of Legal Tech Conferences

4. Resolutions for Tech Improvement in 2019

5. Taking Back Control: Managing Your Tech Addiction the Smart Way

6. Deep Fakes: Preparing Lawyers to Combat Counterfeits

7. Exploring Mary Meeker’s 2019 Internet Trends Report

8. Technology Competence Perspectives

9. Emojis and Gifs: Pictorial Language Implications in Law

10. Exploring the Definition of “Legal Technology”

In my opinion, we’re currently in a run of great episodes and have some great ideas for future.

Looking at the numbers, I’d expect the following episodes to have a good chance of having made their way into the top 10 if we checked back in six months:

Cyber “Insecurity”: Why You Need to Rethink your Security Practices

Quantum Computing — How Will it Affect the Legal Profession?

The Rewarding Practice of Personal Quarterly Off-Sites

Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law

Even More Cool Tools!

The full archive of episodes can be found here.

But we want to hear from our listeners – that means you. We have a voice mail number at (720) 441-6820. Or you can LinkedIn message Tom or me or you can reach me by commenting on this post or sending me an email.

Thanks for listening!!

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

LinkedIn Profile. Also, see LinkedIn showcase page for Dennis Kennedy’s books.

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Download my FREE “57 Tips for Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law” (PDF).

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

For many years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read 89 books, exceeding my goal by quite a bit. Or, more accurately, I listed 89 books that I read. I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on. You will also notice tat I’ve been attempting to read the entire catalog of books of certain authors of detective stories.

If you forced me to pick my top books for 2019 (in alphabetical order), I’d probably list:

[I’m not sure why Amazon generates the cover images in such different sizes.]
Continue Reading 52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2020