We went to see the Bruce Springsteen show in St. Louis on Sunday. I planned to blog about it last night, but the story of the cancellation of last night’s Kansas City show because of the death of Springsteen’s cousin and road crew manager had just broken and it seemed best to wait a day.
In addition to extending my sympathies, I did want to note that I specifically noticed the performance of the road crew during the show – they seemed especially professional and attentive. As we waited for the show to start, I noticed the attention to safety as the crew crawled up the ladders into the lights.
As long-time readers of this blog know, I’ve seen Springsteen play live many times and I can fairly be characterized as a big fan. I’m not going to write anything like a review here – just sketch out a few notes and observations, especially for my friends Jim and Dr. Jeff – and note that this show is definitely worth seeing if it comes to your town.
I knew before we went that Springsteen would be playing the entire Born to Run album from beginning to end in order during the show. I also suspected before I went that that performance would be among the highlights of shows remembered as I look back in future years. It will indeed be.
This show features the E Street Band and we got the full E Street Band experience, with a wide-ranging rocking show that featured all of the players from time to time. I’ll also note that you do start to wonder if this will be the last E Street Band tour or, at least, how many more there will be. Danny Federici is gone already. It’s an older group, to be sure, but they have tremendous energy as a band.
Here’s the set list:
Wrecking Ball
Seeds
Prove It All Night
Hungry Heart
Working On A Dream
Thunder Road
Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out
Night
Backstreets
Born To Run
She’s The One
Meeting Across The River
Jungleland
Waiting On A Sunny Day
Working On The Highway
The Promised Land
Lonesome Day
The Rising
Badlands
No Surrender
For You
Roll Over Beethoven
Surprise Surprise
Detroit Medley
American Land
Dancing In The Dark
Rosalita
Highlights:
1. Born to Run – The Live Version. Bruce’s intro was simple and to the point. It’s interesting to realize now how much really depended on this album selling. It would have been the third strike if it hadn’t and none of the other records might have come after. Bruce made a reference to that and the fact that it is a young person’s record. As the album unfolded, I was struck by how little it sounds like the rest of the music that came out at the time. Standout moments included a breath-takingly good version of Backstreets, the moment the lights come up on the entire audience in Born to Run, the trumpet work on Across the River, and an elegiac version of Jungleland to end. Bruce brought out the guys in the band who created the record (with a reference to the missing Danny). I’d call it a great gift to long-time fans and one of the great memories I’ll have of his shows.
2. I could have made a zillion predictions for what he might play and never come up with the solo piano version of “For You” he played by request. Quite a rare treat and a compelling performance.
3. Nils Lofgrin’s guitar solo in Prove it All Night – almost other worldly – I’ve never seen/heard anything quite like it. I’m a big fan of Bruce’s solos in Prove it All Night over the years, but this one was a stunner and worthy addition to the history of solos in the song.
4. The sequence of Lonesome Day, The Rising, Badlands and No Surrender, which to me seemed to follow a compelling logic. At the end of each song, I was thinking that I wished he’d play the next song, and he did.
5. Rising Just a great St. Louis moment – playing Roll Over Beethoven, by request, in Chuck Berry’s hometown.
It was almost 3 hours, basically non-stop, and quite enjoyable. As I say, worth checking out if it omes to your town, especially if he will be doing one of the entire album segments. And, Bruce’s dynamic energy at age 60 is an inspiration.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
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I’m looking forward to be one of the panelist on Thursday night (July 16) at the Social Media Club of St. Louis’s legal and ethics panel discussion and networking event. It’ll be held at Moulin Events, in the first floor Chouteau Room at 2017 Chouteau Ave, Saint Louis, MO 63103. Sign up for a spot here. It’d be great to meet some readers of this blog in person there.
It’s a stellar panel, moderated by Matt Homann. Other panelists include Rex (@rex7) Gradeless, Dana (@dloesch) Loesch and Eric Kayira. It’s meant to be educational and entertaining and give an introduction to some of the legal and ethical issues we are finding in the era of social media.
I know Matt is busily gathering questions and I’m not quite sure what to prepare for, but I’ll do my best.
As I prepare, I’ve been thinking about the basic notions of openness and transparency in the social media setting.
I had this idea for a simple three-step approach to openness and transparency that I’ll probably offer at the session and that I’ll try out here in advance.
Here’s the concept:
Three Basic Steps:
1. Capacity
2. Required or Recommended Disclosures
3. Practical Impact; Setting Expectations.

The Details.
1. Capacity.
First, identify who you are and in what capacity you are speaking. The will help address the work/personal issue. State clearly that you are speaking in your personal capacity and not in your work capactiy. Also, if you are speaking in your work capacity (after making sure you are permitted to do that), state clearly that you are speaking in that capacity. Clarify capacity in any other case where people might be confused (e.g, if someone thinks that you might be speaking on behalf of someone else). I always spell out that I am speaking in a personal capacity. Interestingly, I’ve given thought lately to spelling out that just because I write a column for the ABA Journal, I am not speaking on behalf of the American Bar Association. Surprisingly, there are occasionally people who seem to think that it’s an official statement of the organization (which it isn’t) rather than a personal opinion column (which it clearly is).
2. Required and Recommended Disclosures. I probably need to come up with a better word for the second category. The idea here is that you might have certain legally-required or otherwise mandated disclosures or disclaimers. Lawyers, for example, will clearly identify that they are not giving legal advice or post other required disclaimers. Others might have similar requirements or even legal requirements. There are often recommended disclosures of facts that your audience would want to know – whether you’ve been paid, received gifts or have financial or other interests or conflicts. This step requires some exercise of judgment and, at least in part, an exercise of putting yourself in the place of your audience to see what you, as an audience member, would want to know to help fairly evaluate what you are presenting.
3. Practical Impact; Setting Expectations. In one sense, this is optional, but, in another, it’s quite a valuable thing to do. Help your audience understand what the practical impact of steps 1 and 2. For example, if I state that I can’t give legal advice, then it’s helpful to tell your audience that you will speak very generally, not answer specific questions based on unique facts or even indicate that it might seem that you are ducking questions. You can also say that although you won’t give specific answers, you’ll try to sketch out the issues to consider and give a framework for addressing the type of question. Others might indicate that they can’t discuss “forward-looking” information or will avoid topics where they have a financial interest. That’s all part of setting realistic expectations and respect your audience.
If you handle these steps sequentially, you can establiish transparenct, set expectations and connect whith your audience quickly when speaking, blogging or doing your profile or making other introductions in social media. It can be quite simple: “I’m a lawyer at XYZ firm, but I’m speaking personally not on behalf of my firm. I’m here to educate, not to give legal advice. As a result, I’ll be teaching general concepts, approaches and ways to analyze legal issues rather than providing specific answers to specific questions. That said, let’s jump into the topic.”
Anyway, that’s the idea I’m toying with. I’d be interested in your reactions.,
Also, Tom Mighell and I will be recording a new episode of our podcast this week. If you have any questions of general interest about legal technology for our audience Q & A segment, let me know.
And, if you are in St. Louis on the 16th, stop on by the Social Media Club panel event and say hello. It’s a great panel and should be fun and educational.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Lots of interest in St. Louis about the baseball all-star game. On Saturday evening, we took in the opening of a new photography exhibit featuring some prominent baseball photographers, including my brother-in-law, Dan Donovan, who has several excellent photos (see the show’s home page for one of my favorites and you’ll see more here).
The show is at the Maryland Gallery in Clayton, Missouri, and even the most casual baseball fan will the images. If you’re in town for the All-Star Game or are in Clayton from now through August, you’ll want to check out the exhibit.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
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Anyone else notice this phenomenon lately? I’m starting to wonder if it’s a symptom of the economic turmoil.
Here’s what I’m talking about:
You are driving on a highway and cars are moving at 60 – 70 miles an hour. Then you see one of two similar things happen:
1. A car comes up behind another and begins to follow at a distance of one or two car lengths.
2. A car changes lanes roughly one or two car lengths in front of the car in the other lane.
Often this occurs with no other traffic around.
When it occurs to you, it’s scary.
I see this every day, it seems. For example, tonight someone cut over into my lane with what I would gauge was one car-length to spare (at 60 miles an hour).
Is this phenomenon a response to economic stress? Do people think the laws of physics no longer apply to braking distances? Is this just a St. Louis phenomenon? I’m curious. And I’m not the only one who has commented on this lately.
This is also something different that tailgating out of road rage (I saw an incident of that recently and that’s really scary to see). People appear to think that they are driving normally.
I welcome your thoughts.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
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On February 15, 2003, I launched this blog with the following post:

And so it begins . . .
I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (http://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

The blog was my early birthday present to myself in 2003. I’m sure that many readers will appreciate the Babylon 5 allusion in the title.
One of the annual traditions on this blog is to have a combined blawgiversary (or blogiversary) and birthday (February 17) celebration. I’ve had a lot of fun with this over the years, and done more than a few silly things as part of these celebrations.
However, at heart, blawgiversary/birthday week is a reader appreciation week and a way to say thank you to all the readers of this blog, some of whom have been with me all the years. To all readers, long-time, short-time or first-time, a big thank you for reading this blogger and giving me plenty of reasons to keep this blog rolling year after year.
As usual, I have some treats for readers this week. This year, I’ll give one gift and a couple of treats. There might be more surprises as the week goes on, so stay tuned.
First, I’m turning this week into a “By Request” week. Use the comments, email (denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com) or even Twitter (@dkennedyblog or @denniskennedy) to ask me any question you’d like that would be of general interest, and I’ll try to answer as many of those questions as I can this week. Of course, I reserve the right to duck difficult questions or to answer an easier question than the question you ask.
Two treats:
First, Tom Mighell and I have recorded a podcast about collaboration tools and technologies that you may download and listen to for free. The details on the podcast and how to download it are here.
Second, it wouldn’t be a blawgiversary here without me continuing my tradition of claiming that I’ve arranged a “special deal for readers” to say that something that was already happening today was actually done as a part of this blawgiversary. Tempting as it was, I’ve resisted saying that I worked out a deal for both the Daytona 500 and the NBA All-Star game to be scheduled this year on my blawgiversary day. Instead, I’ll offer up a special $200 discount for early registrants to ABA TECHSHOW 2009 through the end of the month.
Again, a big thank you to all my readers. I’m looking forward to another great year at DennisKennedy.Blog and to answering your questions.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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On February 15, 2003, I launched this blog with the following post:

And so it begins . . .
I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (http://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

The blog was my early birthday present to myself in 2003. I’m sure that many readers will appreciate the Babylon 5 allusion in the title.
One of the annual traditions on this blog is to have a combined blawgiversary (or blogiversary) and birthday (February 17) celebration. I’ve had a lot of fun with this over the years, and done more than a few silly things as part of these celebrations.
However, at heart, blawgiversary/birthday week is a reader appreciation week and a way to say thank you to all the readers of this blog, some of whom have been with me all the years. To all readers, long-time, short-time or first-time, a big thank you for reading this blogger and giving me plenty of reasons to keep this blog rolling year after year.
As usual, I have some treats for readers this week. This year, I’ll give one gift and a couple of treats. There might be more surprises as the week goes on, so stay tuned.
First, I’m turning this week into a “By Request” week. Use the comments, email (denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com) or even Twitter (@dkennedyblog or @denniskennedy) to ask me any question you’d like that would be of general interest, and I’ll try to answer as many of those questions as I can this week. Of course, I reserve the right to duck difficult questions or to answer an easier question than the question you ask.
Two treats:
First, Tom Mighell and I have recorded a podcast about collaboration tools and technologies that you may download and listen to for free. The details on the podcast and how to download it are here.
Second, it wouldn’t be a blawgiversary here without me continuing my tradition of claiming that I’ve arranged a “special deal for readers” to say that something that was already happening today was actually done as a part of this blawgiversary. Tempting as it was, I’ve resisted saying that I worked out a deal for both the Daytona 500 and the NBA All-Star game to be scheduled this year on my blawgiversary day. Instead, I’ll offer up a special $200 discount for early registrants to ABA TECHSHOW 2009 through the end of the month.
Again, a big thank you to all my readers. I’m looking forward to another great year at DennisKennedy.Blog and to answering your questions.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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For the second time in last four years, I’ve found myself at St. Louis Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 awards dinner celebrating a friend being named to the list. In 2005, it was Kevin Buckley and tonight it was my colleague in MasterCard’s law department, Julie Broyles.
What I’ve found is that I really enjoy seeing people I know getting well-deserved recognition.
A big attraction for me to join the law department at MasterCard was getting the chance to work with the excellent team we have in the St. Louis office, so it was great to see Julie get the recognition and us all to get the chance to share in her big moment on a big stage.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
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Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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In the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read.
Last year, I decided to try to do the 52 books in 52 weeks meme (and encourage others to do so). I made it to 64, which seemed pretty good. Here’s the post with the 2008 list.
I’m doing the same thing in 2009, but with a few lessons learned, especially that it’s definitely not worth the hassle of adding Amazon links for each book I read.
My approach is the same as last year – I’ll simply update this specific post from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.
December
November
October
September
46. Free Agent, Jeremy Duns
45. The Age of the Unthinkable, Joshua Ramo
44. The Expediter, David Hageberg
43. The Mad Ones, Tom Folsom
August
42. The Venona Cable, Brent Ghelft
41. The Victorian Internet, Tom Standage
40. Final Notice, Joe Gores
39. Blank Spots on the Map, Trevor Paglen
38. A Brief History of the Future, Jacques Attali
37. The Gemini Contenders, Robert Ludlum
July
36. The Matlock Paper, Repbert Ludlum
35. The Osterman Weekend, Robert Ludlum
34. The Scarlatti Inheritance, Robert Ludlum
33. Say Everything, Scott Rosenberg
32. The Rheinemann Exchange, Robert Ludlum
31. The Matarese Countdown, by Robert Ludlum
30. The Matarese Circle, by Robert Ludlum
29. The Parsifal Mosaic, by Robert Ludlum
28. The Harney & Sons Guide to Tea, by Michael Harney
June
27. Making it All Work, by David Allen
26. Year of the Dog, by Henry Chang
25. The Icarus Agenda, by Robert Ludlum.
24. Bricklin on Technology, by Daniel Bricklin
23. The Chancellor Manuscript, by Robert Ludlum
May
22. Extreme Measures, by Vince Tynan
21. Maui Revealed: The Ultimate Guidebook, by Andrew Doughty
April
20. The Cry of the Halidon, by Robert Ludlum
19. 7 Deadly Scenarios, by Andrew Krepinevich
18. Moscow Rules, by Dan Silva
March
17. Divine Justice, by Dave Baldacci
16. The End of Lawyers?”, by Richard Susskind
15. Rules of Deception, by Christopher Reich
February
14. Inevitable Surprises, by Peter Schwartz
13. Our Iceberg is Melting, John Kotter
12. Ghost War, Alex Berenson
11. The Spies of Warsaw, Alan Furst
10. Inside Drucker’s Brain, Jeffrey Krames
9. Kiss Me, Deadly, Mickey Spillane
8. The Big Kill, Mickey Spilane

January
7. One Lonely Night, Mickey Spillane
6. Vengeance is Mine, Mickey Spillane
5. My Gun is Quick, Mickey Spillane
4. I, The Jury, Mickey Spillane
3. Enough, John Bogle
2. The Parsifal Mosaic, Robert Ludlum
1. The Culture of War, Martin Van Creveld

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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As longtime readers of this blog will know, I’ve written before (here, here and here) that the Martin Luther King Holiday is one of my favorite holidays of the year. It’s a perfect day to take some time to reflect. It also seems lately that it’s one of the few holidays that people actually get off work anymore. This year’s holiday also clearly has a special significance.
I also enjoy monitoring Technorati for the posts about MLK and Twitter Search. Try it.
Lots of interesting posts to find today.I like Bert Decker’s Master Speakers King and Obama, the Teaching Company has a free mp3 download of a lecture about MLK , and Art Howe’s The Arc of the Universe Is Long But It Bends Towards Justice (wow, what a sentiment that is!). Check for yourself and see what you find. As they say, “Make It a Day ON, Not a Day Off!”
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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This is part 3 of a 3-part retrospective on the year 2008 on DennisKennedy.Blog.
In part 1 of this retrospective, I covered the articles I wrote in 2008 and the related posts about them. In part two, I covered the other posts I wrote on this blog in 2008.
In this part three, I cover the posts I planned to write but never got written.
I decided to write this post for three reasons:
1. The idea itself came from an idea I had for a post that I didn’t write a few months ago when a meme was making the rounds in which bloggers wrote about how they chose what they posted about.
2, I’ve always loved the writings of Jorge Luis Borges in which he wrote book reviews of books that didn’t exist. This is a small homage and it’s better than my old idea of writing software reviews of programs that didn’t exist. I realized that people would really believe the reviews and that might not be a good thing. You probably noticed all the excitement over the “keyboardless” Mac joke today. You do have to be careful about taking ironic approaches on law-related blogs.
3. I actually have notes of blog post ideas that I have jotted down throughout the year.
And it also gives me a chance to put a bit of closure on the one post that I didn’t write that I’ve thought about for the last few months: the dreaded Part 5 of my series on My Next Laptop is an iPod Touch.
Here’s part 5, in a nutshell. The iPod Touch as secondary laptop worked almost exactly how I planned. When I travel, it’s great. I can go to conferences and carry only the iPod Touch rather than a backpack and a laptop. At the public library, I can get on the WiFi and check my Amazon Wishlist to see if books are available at the library. Checking Gmail, Google Reader, weather, news and the like whenever I have access to WiFi is great.
There’s just one problem. For me (and in part, but just in part, it’s because I’m using iTunes on Windows in connection with the iPod Touch), iTunes remains one of the quirkiest and most frustrating programs I’ve ever used. Unless I exit out of iTunes and reopen it before I sync to the iPod Touch, the time and date will be set randomly. Google it and you’ll see that that’s not an issue unique to me.
Bottom line: I’m a huge fan of the iPod Touch and it extended the range of my laptop and serves as a second laptop in a great way in situations where I travel or have access to WiFi. However, I’d suggest that people might have better luck with iTunes on a Mac than on Windows or might expect some odd behaviors in a Windows environment. I mean, I can live with it OK, but it is frustrating (and I have to take a big deep breath and say a short prayer before I install an iTunes update) even for me, and I doubt that others will want to be as patient as I am. On the other hand, it all might work just fine for you, and that’s the quirkiness I refer to. By the way, my experiment was purposely done in the Windows environment, so there’s no need to give me the “get a Mac” advice. However, I’d enjoy reading your post if you try the same experiment in a Mac environment.
On the posts I didn’t write.
As I said, I pulled together some of my notes on blog posts I had planned in 2008. I often think up posts on my bike rides. Some of them get written. Some of them get noted. But there are a lot of unwritten blog posts scattered to the side of Grant’s Trail.
Here’s the list I pulled out of my notes, plus a few I remembered as I was writing this:
Here’s What’s Bugging Me about iTunes Now (just joking)
Legal Ethics and Web 2.0
Three Inexpensive Technologies I Really Like and Use Myself
Reflections on Raymond Chandler
Four WInds
Blog/Blawg 2.0
An Audience Survey
My Favorite Podcasts
Recommended Podcasts for Lawyers
The Power Cord is the Weakest Link
Using Extension Cords to Make Friends at Conferences
Projector Tips from Projector Failures I’ve Known
The Best Skills a Lawyer Can Have
Using the LazyWeb
Some Reflections on my Experience with Twitter (and Facebook and LinkedIn)
The Difficulties of Staying on Topic on Your Blog
Thoughts on Editing Podcasts
What Can ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption Show Teach Presenters
Why I Love getAbstract
Getting Deeper into Podcasts
The Library of Nineveh
Various Reflections on Books I’ve Read
A Guidebook for Fourth Generation Legal Technology
Marty Schwimmer is a Genius . . . Again
My Recent Conversation with Tom Mighell
Revisiting Open Space Technology
Improving Brainstorming Sessions
A Fond Memoriam on BlogWalk (Thank you Jack Vinson for inviting me to one of my favorite events in my whole blog history)
Open Source Programs Lawyers Might Use
My Facebook Friending Policy
Reconnecting with Childhood Friends Via the Internet
I Just Finished a 50-mile Bike Ride
A Fresh Look at RSS
Why I Hate Using Old Versions of Software
Finding Great Podcasts
The Hardest Thing(s) about Writing a Book
I Love FireFox and Tabbed Browsing, but Too Many Open Tabs is a Hazard
Tony Colleluori Reminded Me What the True Benefits of Blogging Are – see this post
How to be a Better Mentor

That’s the list. I’m not sure I’ll go back to any of these (some would be long posts), but if I see that there might be interest in some of these, I might work on writing a post on the topic. Also, I haven’t done a “By Request” post for a while, so if you have a question that I might answer as a post, let me know in the comments to this post.
On to 2009. Coming soon: my annual legal technology trends article/post.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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