LIOHFL 2ed ImageFor quite a few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read 59 books. Or, more accurately, I listed 59 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

Continue Reading 52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2017

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

Last year, I read 53 books, just topping the goal. Or, more accurately, I listed 53 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2016. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were the Sidney Chambers series and a start on Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

59. The End of Dieting, Joel Fuhrman
58. Spark Joy, Marie Kondo
57. A Great Reckoning, Louise Penny
56. Please Kill Me, Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

November

55. Mapping Decline, Colin Gordon
54. Breaking Cover, Stella Rimington
53. An Obvious Fact, Craig Johnson
52. Think Simple, Ken Segall

October

51. Visual Intelligence, Amy Herman
50. The Noise of Time, Julian Barnes

September

49. Back from the Dead, Bill Walton
48. Any Minute Now, Eric Van Lustbader
47. The Other Side of Silence, Philip Kerr
46. The Index Card, helaine Olan and Harold Pollack

August

45. Daniel Silva, THe Black Widow
44. The Highwayman, Craig Johnson
43. The Bourne Enigma, Eric Van Lustbader
42. Even Dogs in the Wild, Ian Rankin

July

41. My Life in Middlemarch, Rebecca Mead
40. Secular Meditation, Rick Heller
39. The Encore Career Handbook, Marci ALboher
38. How to Make Your Money Last, Jane Bryant Quinn
37. The More of Less, Joshua Becker
36. The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly
35. Change Your Brain, Change Your Body, Daniel Amen
34. Change Your Brain, Change Your Life, Daniel Amen
33. The Mechanical Horse, Margaret Guroff

June

32. The Wolves, Alex Berenson
31. Living Forward, Michael Hyatt
30. The Green Mill Murder, Kerry Greenwood
29. The Castlemaine Murders, Kerry Greenwood

May

28. Dead Man’s Chest, Kerry Greenwood
27. Sprint, Jake Knapp
26. My Adventures with Your Money, T.D. Thornton

April

25. The Mulberry Bush, Charles McCarry
24. Murder in Montparnasse, Kerry Greenwood
23. Death Before Wicket, Kerry Greenwood
22. SPQR – A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
21. A Coffin for Dimitrios, Eric Ambler

March

20. In a Sunburned Country, Bill Bryson
19. Primary Greatness, Stephen Covey
18. Queen of the Flowers, Kerry Greenwood
17. Away with the Fairies, Kerry Greenwood

February

16. The Mark Inside, Amy Reading
15. What to DO to Retire Successfully, Martin Goldstein
14. The Last Kingdom, Bernard Cornwell
13. Murder on the Ballarat Train, Kerry Greenwood
12. The Spy House, Matthew Dunn
11. An Officer and a Spy, Robert Harris
10. Raisins and Almonds, Kerry Greenwood

January

9. The Gifts of Imperfection, Brene Brown
8. Quiet, Susan Cain
7. Pirate Latitudes, Michael Crichton
6. The Stuff of Life, Mark Schultz
5. APIs: A Strategy Guide, Daniel Jacobson, Greg Brail and Dan Woods
4. Momofuku, David Chang and Peter Meehan
3. Vision to Reality, Honoree Corder
2. Kettlebell Simple & Sinister, Pavel Tsatsouline
1. The War of Art, Steven Pressfield

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Facebook book with box

Last year, I read 58 books, 6 more than in 2013. Or, more accurately, I listed 58 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2015. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were Robert van Gulik’s Judge Dee mysteries and Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

53. How to Meditate, Pema Chodron
52. Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
51. The Meditation Transformation Jennifer Brooks
50. One Dot, Two Dots, Get Some New Dots, David Silverstein
49. Kerry Greenwood Blood and Circuses
48. Flying Too High, Kerry Greenwood
47. Cociane Blues, Kerry Greenwood
46. Ross Poldark, Winston Graham

November

45. Better Than Before, Gretchen Rubin
44. Indian Summer, Alex Von Tunzelmann
43. Jerusalem: City of Mirrors, Amos Elon
42.What I Saw, Joseph Roth
41. Money: Master the Game, Tony Robbins

October

40. If You Didn’t Bring Jerky, What Di I Just Eat?, Bill Heavey

September

39. The Long Way Home, Louise Penny

August

38. Billie Holiday: The Musician and the Myth, John Szwed
37. The Nature of the Beast, Louise Penny
36. Less Doing, More Living, Ari Meisel
35. Sidney Chambers and the Forgiveness of Sins, James Runcie
34. The English Spy, Daniel Silva
33. Sidney Chambers and the Perils of the Night, James Runcie
32. Sidney Chambers and the Problem of Evil, James Runcie
31. Sidney Chanbers and the Shadow of Death, James Runcie
30. Tomorrowland, Steven Kotler
29. The Age of Cryptocurrency, Paul Vigna and Michael Casey
28. Dreaming Spies, Laurie R. King

July

27. The Janson Equation, Douglas Corleone
26. The Outsiders, Gerald Seymour

June

25. All the Old Knives, Olen Steinhauer
24. Becoming Steve Jobs, Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli
23. Data and Goliath, Bruce Schneier
22. How to Do More in Less Time, Allison Shields and Dan Siegel
21. John Robison, Be Different

May

20. Dry Bones, Craig Johnson
19. The Lady from Zagreb, Philip Kerr
18. Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates, Howard Pyle
17. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
16. 1177, The Year Civilization Collapsed, Eric Cline

April

15. The Republic of Pirates, Colin Woodward
14. Flash Points, George Friedmann
13. The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin
12. The Geneva Strategy, Jamie Freveletti
11. Retribution, David Hagberg

March

10. Slim by Design, Brian Wansink
9. Twelve Days, Alex Berenson
8. Waking Up, Sam Harris
7. Zero to One, Peter Thiel
6. The Journal of Best Practices, David Finch

February

5. Austria, Culture Smart
4. Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, Think Like a Freak
3. The Resilience Dividend, Judith Rodin

January

2. Ada’s Algorithm, James Essinger
1. The Lean Startup, Eric Ries

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read exactly 52 books. Or, more accurately, I listed exactly 52 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on. 2013 was an unusual year for me, too, in the significant number of books I started and gave up on before finishing.

I’m doing the same thing in 2014. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

58. Wait for Signs, Craig Johnson
57. Bitcoin and the Future of Money, Jose Pagliery
56. FastExercise, Michael Mosley
55. The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs, Greil Marcus
54. The Counterfeit Agent, Alex Berenson

November

53. The Heist, Dan Silva
52. Jobs-to-be-Done: The Handbook, Chris Spiek and Bob Moesta
51. Rock Breaks Scissors, William Poundstone
50. The American Mission, Matthew Palmer

October

49. How the Light Gets In, Louise Penny
48. The Outlandish Companion, Diana Gabaldon
47. The Brutal Telling, Louise Penny
46. Talk Like TED, Carmine Gallo
45. Driving Honda, Jeffrey Rothfeder

September

44. The First 90 Days, Michael Watkins
43. There Goes Gravity, Lisa Robinson
42. Wild Storm, Richard Castle
41. The March of Mobile Money, Sam Pitroda and Mehul Desai
40. A Trick of the Light, Louise Penny
39. A Rule Against Murder, Louise Penny
38. Rework, Jason Fried

August

37. How the World Sees You, Sally Hogshead
36. The Fires of the Gods, I. J. Parker
35. The Cruelest Month, Louise Penny
34. The Beautiful Mystery, Louise Penny

July

33. Murder on the Home Front, Molly Lefebure
32. Saints of the Shadow Bible, Ian Rankin
31. You are Your Own Gym, Mike Laurer
30. Still Life, Louise Penny

June

29. Let Loose the Dogs, Maureen Jennings
28. Poor Tom is Cold, Maureen Jennings
27. Jony Ive, Leander Kahney

May

26. Any Other Name, Craig Johnson
25. Soccer in Sun and Shadow, Eduardo Galeano
24. How to be Danish, Patrick Kingsley
23. Pitch Perfect, Bill McGowan
22. A Short Guide to a Long Life, David Agus
21. George Washington’s Secret Six, Brian Kilmeade
20. The Janson Option, Paul Garrison
19. The Vikings, Neil Oliver

April

18. The Haunted Monastery, Robert Van Gulik
17. Night Work, Laurie R. King
16. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, Brad Stone
15. The Mongolian Conspiracy, Rafael Bernal

March

14. The Bourne Retribution, Eric Van Lustbader
13. Judge Dee at Work, Robert Van Gulik
12. Wild Fermentation, Sandor Ellix Katz

February

11. The Chinese Lake Murders, Robert Van Gulik
10. The Chinese Gold Murders, Robert Van Gulik
9. Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, Robert Van Gulik

January

8. How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Scott Adams
7. Europe Between the Oceans, Barry Cunliffe
6. Feldenkrais:The Busy Person’s Guide to Easier Movement, Frank Wildman
5. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, John Lukacs
4. Spirit of Steamboat, Craig Johnson
3. A Man Without Breath, Philip Kerr
2. A Cook’s Tour, Anthony Bourdain
1. Italian Ways, Tim Parks

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

It’s nice to see LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition in the Best Sellers section of the ABA Web Store. A big thank you to readers of this blog who have bought the book.

If you’d like to get a good idea of what’s in the book, the Law Technology Today blog has made available a generous excerpt from the book in a post called Create a LinkedIn Action Plan, courtesy of Lindsay Dawson, whose assistance with getting the word out on our books has been invaluable.

The excerpt comes from the concluding chapter of the book and outlines the three essential building blocks of LinkedIn (Profile, Connections and Participation) and gives three practical action steps, one for each building block. The action steps are simple, concrete actions you can take that require a small investment of time and should improve your results from LinkedIn.

Let me excerpt a bit of that excerpt:

1. Profile.

Your Profile Action Step

Reread and rewrite your Profile summary so that it has an external focus, telling readers exactly what you want them to know about you so that they will want to connect with you.

2. Connections.

Your Connections Action Step

Try to set and reach a reasonable goal for your total number of Con­nections. Reaching fifty Connections will help your Profile strength.

3. Participation.

Your Participation Action Step

Try to post at least one Update per week for a month. Building relation­ships takes time, whether in person or online. Use LinkedIn to identify and gain information about people you have just met or will be meeting, and keep using it to strengthen relationships and expand your network.

There’s more in the post on Law Technology Today.

I’ve really enjoyed getting the chance to speak about what’s in the book on podcasts and webinars recently, but have especially enjoyed spending some one-on-one time helping people improve their approach to LinkedIn, several of whom were not lawyers. Which leads to the question: “What if there were a version of this book not targeted at lawyers and other legal professionals?” Allison and I have heard that question a lot and all I can say is stay tuned for our answer to that question, which will be revealed soon.

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition can be purchased through the ABA Store or in an iBook version on iTunes.LIOHFL2 Cover

Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Box of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers 2Ed booksA box of books arrived at my door – my copies of the new Second Edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers. All of the work on a book project finally seems real and tangible when you get the box of books and hold one in your hands.

Allison Shields and I wrote the original LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers about a year-and-a-half ago. Then we wrote Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, which debuted about a year ago. We didn’t expect that we’d be writing a second edition so soon, but the massive interface and layout changes and feature updates at LinkedIn and the overwhelmingly positive response we got to the book pushed up our target for preparing a new edition.

LinkedIn’s changes continued all through the writing of the new book this summer and took a lot more work than we expected just to keep up with the changes. We also had the chance to incorporate some of our new ideas on LinkedIn, materials from articles and presentations we’ve given, practical tips and techniques Allison uses when she does training on LinkedIn, and discussion of new features.

In other words, the Second Edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is a major update and we’re proud of the new version.

Among other things, you’ll find:

    • All new illustrations, reflection the major interface changes.
    • Discussion of new features like Endorsements and a reconsideration of the use of Premium Accounts.
    • Updated material on Company Pages, Ethics, Ads, Mobile Apps and Privacy Settings.
    • Our best new practical ideas and tips for using LinkedIn in effective ways.
  • The book continues to focus on ten “lessons,” provides more detail on some advanced topics like ethics, and includes a generous helping of our favorite 60 LinkedIn tips.

    Here’s the description of the new edition from the ABA’s Web Store:

    Since the first edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers was published, LinkedIn has added almost 100 million users, and more and more lawyers are using the platform on a regular basis. Now, this bestselling ABA book has been fully revised and updated to reflect significant changes to LinkedIn’s layout and functionality made through 2013. LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition, will help lawyers make the most of their online professional networking. In just one hour, you will learn to:

    Set up a LinkedIn account

    Create a robust, dynamic profile–and take advantage of new multimedia options

    Build your connections

    Get up to speed on new features such as Endorsements, Influencers, Contacts, and Channels

    Enhance your Company Page with new functionality

    Use search tools to enhance your network

    Monitor your network with ease

    Optimize your settings for privacy concerns

    Use LinkedIn effectively in the hiring process

    Develop a LinkedIn strategy to grow your legal network

    As I write this, the book is still available with a 15% pre-order discount. Since we’ve received our author copies already, I’m going to suggest that you act quickly on the pre-order discount. There was a lot of interest in using the first edition in connection with training classes for lawyers in large firms and corporate law departments and we had that in mind when writing the second edition. If interested in that, please inquire about bulk discounts.

    The order page is here.

    Watch for news coming soon about a second book project.

    On October 17, Allison and I will presenting a webinar called LinkedIn for Lawyers Reloaded, co-sponsored by ALI CLE and the ABA’s Law Practice Division.

    Dennis Kennedy

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

    In perhaps the classic example of “I didn’t have enough time to write a shorter article, so I wrote a longer one,” I have a new article out in the February issue of the Law Practice Today webzine. It runs about 3,000 words and is called “Thirteen Facebook Tips for Lawyers in 2013.”

    As the article summary says:

    Still scared of Facebook? Come on, it’s 2013 already—can 1 billion users really all be wrong? Here are 13 tips to guide even the most reluctant late adopter on how to get the most of the most popular social media tool.

    The article offers some of my observations about lawyers using (and, mainly, not using) Facebook, thirteen practical tips (anybody else notice that matching the number of tips to the year has upped the degree of difficulty for these types of tips articles?), and three simple action steps to get yourself going on Facebook.

    The money quote:

    There are many reasons lawyers probably should be using Facebook, but I’m not sure that convince many reluctant lawyers with those reasons. Instead, consider my view that there may be no better resource than Facebook to help you reconnect with people who were important in your life with whom you have lost contact.

    I expect that Allison Shields and I will cover many of these tips in more detail in our upcoming presentation on LinkedIn and Facebook at ABA TECHSHOW 2013 in Chicago in April.You will also have the chance to talk about these topics with Allison and me at the Taste of TECHSHOW dinner we will be hosting on April 4.

    Hope you find the new article helpful.If you want to dive even deeper into Facebook, you might consider reading Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, which is also available in an iBook version.

    What other tips do you have for for lawyers to make better use of Facebook?

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

    For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

    Last year, I read 56 books.

    I’m doing the same thing in 2013. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

    I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

    As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

    December

    52. Becoming a Supple Leopard, Kelly Starrett
    51. Seeing What Others Don’t, Gary Klein
    50. Decisive, Chip Heath and Dan Heath
    49. The Lawyer’s Field Guide to Effective Business Development, William Flannery
    48. The Sports Gene, David Epstein
    47. Learnings from the Long View, Peter Schwartz
    46. The United States of Paranoia, Jesse Walker

    November

    45. The Legal Side of Blogging: How Not to get Sued, Fired, Arrested, or Killed, Ruth Carter
    44. The Investigator, Terry Lenzner
    43. The English Girl, Daniel Silva
    42. Sleepless in Hollywood, Lynda Obst
    41. The Flamethrowers, Rachel Kushner
    40. Beloved Enemy, Eric Lustbader

    October

    39. Slow Getting Up, Nate Jackson
    38. The Art of Thinking Clearly, Rolf Dobelli
    37. Letter to a A Young Scientist, Edward O. Wilson
    36. The Consummata, Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins
    35. The Map of Innovation, Kevin O’Connor

    September

    34. WordPress Websites in One Hour for Lawyers, Jennifer Ellis
    33. Big Data, Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier
    32. Lawn Gone, Pam Penick

    August

    31. Tea Lover’s Treasury, James Norwood Pratt
    30. Revolutionary Summer, Joseph Ellis
    29. The Shanghai Factor, Charles McCarry

    July

    28. A Serpent’s Tooth, Craig Johnson
    27. Seven Daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes

    June

    26. Foreign Influence, Brad Thor
    25. Psych’s Guide to Crime Fighting for the Totally Unqualified, Shawn Spencer and Burton Guster
    24. The Expats, Chris Pavone
    23. The Signal and the Noise, Nat Silver

    May

    22. Frozen Heat, Richard Castle
    21. How Georgia Became O;Keeffe, Karen Karbo
    20. Dreamland, David Randall
    19. Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Dummies, Vanessa Williams

    April

    18. Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, Maria Konnikova
    17. The Utopia Experimment, Kyle Mills
    16. The Aden Effect, Claude Berube

    March

    15. The March of Folly, Barbara Tuchman
    14. The Aden Effect, Claude Berube
    13. iPad in One Hour for Lawyers, Tom Mighell
    12. Why Grow That When You Can Grow This, Andrew Keys
    11. Mission to Paris, Alan Furst

    February

    10. Among the Islands, Tim Flannery
    9. Spy the Lie, Philip Houston, Michael Floyd and Susan Carnicero
    8. Yoga for People Who Can’t Be Bothered to Do It, Geoff Dyer
    7. Garment of Shadows, Laurie R. King

    January

    6. Naked Heat, Richard Castle
    5. Heat Wave, Richard Castle
    4. Trust Me I’m Lying, Ryan Holiday
    3. Death Without Company, Craig Johnson
    2. How Music Works, David Byrne
    1. Bruce, Peter Ames Carlin

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

    When I got home from work this evening, I found a package that had been delivered today. I opened it and found:

    A closer look:

    Yes, the new book from Allison Shields and me, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, has arrived. For me, my books only really seem real when I get my personal copies in hand.

    This book is our “sequel” to LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, which was published earlier this year. In fact, what I mainly remember about the publication of the LinkedIn book was how fast the deadline for the first draft of the Facebook book was approaching.

    We’re quite pleased with the way Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers turned out, although we stretch the concept of “in one hour” well past the breaking point. You’ll get a lot of value in this book. I did prove that it is possible to read the main section of this book in one hour, but I’m a really fast reader.

    I believe that the book is still technically in the pre-order period and is available with a 15% discount as a pre-order. We’re excited about this book and think you will be, too. If your firm or organization might consider using the book for social media training efforts, let me know and I can put you in touch with our publishing contacts for info about volume discounts. If you might be interested in a review copy (and have an audience that will appreciate the review), let me know. And, of course, don’t forget about LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers.

    Although, frankly, I expect the only book Allison and I might consider next would be “Resting Up after Writing Two Books in Less Than a Year in One Hour for Lawyers,” I have grown fond of the “in One Hour” format and I think it has a lot of potential. I’ll be the Vice-chair of the ABA Law Practice Management Section’s Publishing Board this year and would be happy to hear any topics for an “in One Hour” book that you know that you would definitely buy.

    Here’s a link the ordering page for Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers – I hope you enjoy the book.

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    The book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available and also as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

    Allison Shields and I are grateful for the overwhelmingly positive response we gotten to our book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers. A big thank you to everyone who has purchased the book.

    I’m pleased to announce that the book is now available as an iBook in the iTunes store. The price of the iBook is $17.99, a nice discount from the price of the traditional paperback version.

    Allison and I have also started a LinkedIn Group in connection with the book (and the upcoming Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers book that we anticipate being published in August) called “Social Networking for Lawyers. Please consider joining the group to continue the conversation about the use of LinkedIn by lawyers.

    We have been (welcomely) surprised by the interest by law firms in using the book as part of their internal LinkedIn training efforts. If your firm might be interested in exploring that route, we can help you get in touch with ABA Publishing about volume discounts. And, if you are an ABA Law Practice Management Section member (and, if you read this blog, you should be), it looks like there’s still a great discount available on the paperback version for LPM members.

    iBook link

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    The new book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available *and as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.