There is a period after you finish writing a book when you start to feel like you are about to throw it off a cliff into the ocean. Will anyone read it? Will anyone like it? Most importantly, will it help anyone?

And that even happens when you finish the second edition of a book that was as well-received as the first edition of Tom Mighell and I’s The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together.

We’re starting to hear from people who have read the book and it’s starting to feel like we didn’t throw the book off a cliff. In fact, we are very pleased with the comments we’ve gotten and are grateful for what people have had to say about the book.

Here’s a sampling.

Carolyn Elefant (of MyShingle.com fame) posted a comment on Facebook that made all the hard work seem worthwhile. Carolyn is a pioneer in the use of the Internet by lawyers and it’s difficult to put into words how much this comment meant to us:

The first edition of Dennis’ and Tom Mighell’s book on collaborative tech tools was released over 10 years ago and it soon became a staple of my law practice. I used the tech recommendations on wikis to help my then-30 member trade association draft 65 pages of comments on regulations for siting offshore renewables on the outer continental shelf and drafting and marking up legislation that lead to $50 million in federal appropriations for these nascent technologies. I have collaborated with my virtual assistant of 9 years using some or all of these tools and relied on them to attempt to create an #altlaw consortium law firm back in 2009 before anyone was doing that kind of stuff. Legal Tech is often confined to its own silos and so we don’t realize the profound contribution that it often makes to substantive law so I think it is important for those of us in the trenches who are actually using this stuff for real clients and real causes to share our experience. As an Audible convert, I don’t buy many books these days but I plan on purchasing this new edition at Tech Show.

Jordan Furlong of Law21.ca fame and the author of Law Is a Buyer’s Market: Building A Client-First Law Firm recently unleashed a “ttweetstorm” review that had us blushing, but very grateful:

Ten years ago, almost to the day, I published a review of “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies,” by @denniskennedy and @TomMighell: http://bit.ly/2rGWoa1 1/10

If you’re a younger or newer arrival on the legal tech scene, you might not appreciate just how much Dennis and Tom were (and are) giants of legal technology development and scholarship. 2/10

Meeting and speaking with Dennis at my first ABA TECHSHOW was a thrill for me. When Tom highlighted Law21 in his “Inter Alia” newsletter as “Blawg of the Day,” I was so pumped I wrote a post about it. 3/10

“The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies,” as my 2008 review attests, was a landmark publication — but not just because of the extraordinarily detailed insight and practical advice it contained. 4/10

It was important because it both foretold and helped usher in an entirely new category of legal scholarship: The study of *how lawyers worked.* 5/10

That wasn’t a subject most people talked or wrote about. But Dennis and Tom saw clearly, before the rest of us, that legal technology was going to transform the “how” of lawyer work. That might seem commonplace today. It was borderline radical in 2008. 6/10

And they were entirely correct that the most significant impact of tech on how lawyers work would be “less about personal productivity and more about using technology to make it easier for people to work together.” 7/10

Collaboration is the future of law practice. More accurately, it’s the future of “legal services delivery,” a better phrase that focuses on value to the client and the relationships among clients and providers to create that value. Dennis and Tom saw that before any of us. 8/10

All of which is to say that I think “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies” is one of the most important books in the recent history of law practice management and technology. And that’s why this next and final tweet is especially good news: 9/10

Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell have published a Revised Second Edition of “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies” (https://shop.americanbar.org/eBus/Store/ProductDetails.aspx?productId=312056356&pubstartdate=2018-02-01&pubenddate=2018-05-08&sortby=Date+(DESC)&perpage=250 …). If you want to know the present and future of collaborative legal services, this is the book for you.

The thoughtful and wise John Heckman at the Does It Compute? blog recently posted a review that did a great job of summarizing our key points and themes and said:

The Second Edition of Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell’s Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies is long overdue. The book is a sweeping panorama of the wide variety of tools available to lawyers today in what is perhaps the most rapidly evolving area of web-based technologies.

The book has two distinct areas: “how to” accomplish varieties of collaboration, and arguments in favor of it. The latter element is probably even more important than the “how tos.” As they put it: “Technology choices are always more about culture than they are about technology.” They return to this theme repeatedly in an effort to address the issue of what I call “dysfunctional” law firms: where each individual senior partner is like a medieval duke in his own little castle on top of his own little hill.

Just one more (do I seem like a proud parent?):

Niki Black, the well-known author on legal tech, has a post on Above the Law called “Online Collaboration For Lawyers: Security Issues, Recommendations, And Predictions” that reviews the book in detail and also does a great job of covering our key points. Niki concludes:

Choosing the right tools for secure communication and collaboration in your law firm won’t be easy. But the time spent will pay off in the long run, since the collaboration choices you make today will necessarily impact your firm down the road. That’s why it’s so important to make educated decisions that will help to lay the groundwork for your firm’s future success. And if you’re not sure where to start, this book is a great resource that can help you make the right long-term collaboration software decisions for your firm.

I second all the points Niki makes about security in online collaboration in her post. Tom and I will be speaking on that very topic at the 2018 College of Law Practice Management Futures Conference in October. Our session is called “Cybersecurity is a Team Sport.” If you are interested in having Tom and me speak to your group on that topic, please contact me.

As for our book, we are delighted by the reaction so far. If you want to buy the book (and I know I’ve gotten you interested), you can get it at the ABA Shop.

+++++++++++++++++

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Now available:

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Photo of box of books

Ten years ago, Tom Mighell and I wrote the first edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together. We decided that it was time for a second edition. The photo to the right is the box of books that arrived at my house recently. For an author, that’s when it really feels like the book is finally done.

For the reader, however, it’s probably more meaningful that the book is available for purchase more so than that I have received my copies.

The good news is that you can now purchase the book from the ABA Bookstore. Only the paperback version is currently available. I’m told that the eBook version will be available in the near future. Check my blog and the ABA Bookstore page for the book for details on that.

Much has changed in the last ten years, so the book has many revised and new chapters, including an all new chapter on Slack. It is just one on several now important tools that didn’t even exist ten years ago.

While writing the book, Tom and I noted a few big changes:

  1. The movement to smartphones and mobile apps is probably the biggest trend in this area.
  2. Most lawyers and others now understand the potential and the utility of the cloud.
  3. Names have changed, but many collaboration technology concepts have stayed the same.
  4. Culture and process are ultimately more important than specific technologies and tools.

In my opinion, the book is even better than before and I encourage you to look into the book, consider buying it, and definitely recommend it to your friends.

We are in the rollout stage for the book. If you regularly review books for a legal audience and would like a reviewer copy, please let Tom or me know. Both of us expect to be speaking on this topic, so contact us if that is a good topic for your group.

Writing a book is hard work, but it’s great to get to unveil the result to the world.

Ordering information for book can be found here.

 

 

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now available: The new second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For quite a few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read 79 books, exceeding my goal by quite a bit. Or, more accurately, I listed 79 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

Continue Reading 52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2018

For quite a few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read 59 books. Or, more accurately, I listed 59 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

Continue Reading 52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2017

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

Last year, I read 53 books, just topping the goal. Or, more accurately, I listed 53 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2016. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were the Sidney Chambers series and a start on Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

59. The End of Dieting, Joel Fuhrman
58. Spark Joy, Marie Kondo
57. A Great Reckoning, Louise Penny
56. Please Kill Me, Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

November

55. Mapping Decline, Colin Gordon
54. Breaking Cover, Stella Rimington
53. An Obvious Fact, Craig Johnson
52. Think Simple, Ken Segall

October

51. Visual Intelligence, Amy Herman
50. The Noise of Time, Julian Barnes

September

49. Back from the Dead, Bill Walton
48. Any Minute Now, Eric Van Lustbader
47. The Other Side of Silence, Philip Kerr
46. The Index Card, helaine Olan and Harold Pollack

August

45. Daniel Silva, THe Black Widow
44. The Highwayman, Craig Johnson
43. The Bourne Enigma, Eric Van Lustbader
42. Even Dogs in the Wild, Ian Rankin

July

41. My Life in Middlemarch, Rebecca Mead
40. Secular Meditation, Rick Heller
39. The Encore Career Handbook, Marci ALboher
38. How to Make Your Money Last, Jane Bryant Quinn
37. The More of Less, Joshua Becker
36. The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly
35. Change Your Brain, Change Your Body, Daniel Amen
34. Change Your Brain, Change Your Life, Daniel Amen
33. The Mechanical Horse, Margaret Guroff

June

32. The Wolves, Alex Berenson
31. Living Forward, Michael Hyatt
30. The Green Mill Murder, Kerry Greenwood
29. The Castlemaine Murders, Kerry Greenwood

May

28. Dead Man’s Chest, Kerry Greenwood
27. Sprint, Jake Knapp
26. My Adventures with Your Money, T.D. Thornton

April

25. The Mulberry Bush, Charles McCarry
24. Murder in Montparnasse, Kerry Greenwood
23. Death Before Wicket, Kerry Greenwood
22. SPQR – A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
21. A Coffin for Dimitrios, Eric Ambler

March

20. In a Sunburned Country, Bill Bryson
19. Primary Greatness, Stephen Covey
18. Queen of the Flowers, Kerry Greenwood
17. Away with the Fairies, Kerry Greenwood

February

16. The Mark Inside, Amy Reading
15. What to DO to Retire Successfully, Martin Goldstein
14. The Last Kingdom, Bernard Cornwell
13. Murder on the Ballarat Train, Kerry Greenwood
12. The Spy House, Matthew Dunn
11. An Officer and a Spy, Robert Harris
10. Raisins and Almonds, Kerry Greenwood

January

9. The Gifts of Imperfection, Brene Brown
8. Quiet, Susan Cain
7. Pirate Latitudes, Michael Crichton
6. The Stuff of Life, Mark Schultz
5. APIs: A Strategy Guide, Daniel Jacobson, Greg Brail and Dan Woods
4. Momofuku, David Chang and Peter Meehan
3. Vision to Reality, Honoree Corder
2. Kettlebell Simple & Sinister, Pavel Tsatsouline
1. The War of Art, Steven Pressfield

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Facebook book with box

Last year, I read 58 books, 6 more than in 2013. Or, more accurately, I listed 58 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2015. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were Robert van Gulik’s Judge Dee mysteries and Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

53. How to Meditate, Pema Chodron
52. Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
51. The Meditation Transformation Jennifer Brooks
50. One Dot, Two Dots, Get Some New Dots, David Silverstein
49. Kerry Greenwood Blood and Circuses
48. Flying Too High, Kerry Greenwood
47. Cociane Blues, Kerry Greenwood
46. Ross Poldark, Winston Graham

November

45. Better Than Before, Gretchen Rubin
44. Indian Summer, Alex Von Tunzelmann
43. Jerusalem: City of Mirrors, Amos Elon
42.What I Saw, Joseph Roth
41. Money: Master the Game, Tony Robbins

October

40. If You Didn’t Bring Jerky, What Di I Just Eat?, Bill Heavey

September

39. The Long Way Home, Louise Penny

August

38. Billie Holiday: The Musician and the Myth, John Szwed
37. The Nature of the Beast, Louise Penny
36. Less Doing, More Living, Ari Meisel
35. Sidney Chambers and the Forgiveness of Sins, James Runcie
34. The English Spy, Daniel Silva
33. Sidney Chambers and the Perils of the Night, James Runcie
32. Sidney Chambers and the Problem of Evil, James Runcie
31. Sidney Chanbers and the Shadow of Death, James Runcie
30. Tomorrowland, Steven Kotler
29. The Age of Cryptocurrency, Paul Vigna and Michael Casey
28. Dreaming Spies, Laurie R. King

July

27. The Janson Equation, Douglas Corleone
26. The Outsiders, Gerald Seymour

June

25. All the Old Knives, Olen Steinhauer
24. Becoming Steve Jobs, Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli
23. Data and Goliath, Bruce Schneier
22. How to Do More in Less Time, Allison Shields and Dan Siegel
21. John Robison, Be Different

May

20. Dry Bones, Craig Johnson
19. The Lady from Zagreb, Philip Kerr
18. Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates, Howard Pyle
17. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
16. 1177, The Year Civilization Collapsed, Eric Cline

April

15. The Republic of Pirates, Colin Woodward
14. Flash Points, George Friedmann
13. The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin
12. The Geneva Strategy, Jamie Freveletti
11. Retribution, David Hagberg

March

10. Slim by Design, Brian Wansink
9. Twelve Days, Alex Berenson
8. Waking Up, Sam Harris
7. Zero to One, Peter Thiel
6. The Journal of Best Practices, David Finch

February

5. Austria, Culture Smart
4. Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, Think Like a Freak
3. The Resilience Dividend, Judith Rodin

January

2. Ada’s Algorithm, James Essinger
1. The Lean Startup, Eric Ries

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read exactly 52 books. Or, more accurately, I listed exactly 52 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on. 2013 was an unusual year for me, too, in the significant number of books I started and gave up on before finishing.

I’m doing the same thing in 2014. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

58. Wait for Signs, Craig Johnson
57. Bitcoin and the Future of Money, Jose Pagliery
56. FastExercise, Michael Mosley
55. The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs, Greil Marcus
54. The Counterfeit Agent, Alex Berenson

November

53. The Heist, Dan Silva
52. Jobs-to-be-Done: The Handbook, Chris Spiek and Bob Moesta
51. Rock Breaks Scissors, William Poundstone
50. The American Mission, Matthew Palmer

October

49. How the Light Gets In, Louise Penny
48. The Outlandish Companion, Diana Gabaldon
47. The Brutal Telling, Louise Penny
46. Talk Like TED, Carmine Gallo
45. Driving Honda, Jeffrey Rothfeder

September

44. The First 90 Days, Michael Watkins
43. There Goes Gravity, Lisa Robinson
42. Wild Storm, Richard Castle
41. The March of Mobile Money, Sam Pitroda and Mehul Desai
40. A Trick of the Light, Louise Penny
39. A Rule Against Murder, Louise Penny
38. Rework, Jason Fried

August

37. How the World Sees You, Sally Hogshead
36. The Fires of the Gods, I. J. Parker
35. The Cruelest Month, Louise Penny
34. The Beautiful Mystery, Louise Penny

July

33. Murder on the Home Front, Molly Lefebure
32. Saints of the Shadow Bible, Ian Rankin
31. You are Your Own Gym, Mike Laurer
30. Still Life, Louise Penny

June

29. Let Loose the Dogs, Maureen Jennings
28. Poor Tom is Cold, Maureen Jennings
27. Jony Ive, Leander Kahney

May

26. Any Other Name, Craig Johnson
25. Soccer in Sun and Shadow, Eduardo Galeano
24. How to be Danish, Patrick Kingsley
23. Pitch Perfect, Bill McGowan
22. A Short Guide to a Long Life, David Agus
21. George Washington’s Secret Six, Brian Kilmeade
20. The Janson Option, Paul Garrison
19. The Vikings, Neil Oliver

April

18. The Haunted Monastery, Robert Van Gulik
17. Night Work, Laurie R. King
16. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, Brad Stone
15. The Mongolian Conspiracy, Rafael Bernal

March

14. The Bourne Retribution, Eric Van Lustbader
13. Judge Dee at Work, Robert Van Gulik
12. Wild Fermentation, Sandor Ellix Katz

February

11. The Chinese Lake Murders, Robert Van Gulik
10. The Chinese Gold Murders, Robert Van Gulik
9. Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, Robert Van Gulik

January

8. How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Scott Adams
7. Europe Between the Oceans, Barry Cunliffe
6. Feldenkrais:The Busy Person’s Guide to Easier Movement, Frank Wildman
5. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, John Lukacs
4. Spirit of Steamboat, Craig Johnson
3. A Man Without Breath, Philip Kerr
2. A Cook’s Tour, Anthony Bourdain
1. Italian Ways, Tim Parks

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

It’s nice to see LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition in the Best Sellers section of the ABA Web Store. A big thank you to readers of this blog who have bought the book.

If you’d like to get a good idea of what’s in the book, the Law Technology Today blog has made available a generous excerpt from the book in a post called Create a LinkedIn Action Plan, courtesy of Lindsay Dawson, whose assistance with getting the word out on our books has been invaluable.

The excerpt comes from the concluding chapter of the book and outlines the three essential building blocks of LinkedIn (Profile, Connections and Participation) and gives three practical action steps, one for each building block. The action steps are simple, concrete actions you can take that require a small investment of time and should improve your results from LinkedIn.

Let me excerpt a bit of that excerpt:

1. Profile.

Your Profile Action Step

Reread and rewrite your Profile summary so that it has an external focus, telling readers exactly what you want them to know about you so that they will want to connect with you.

2. Connections.

Your Connections Action Step

Try to set and reach a reasonable goal for your total number of Con­nections. Reaching fifty Connections will help your Profile strength.

3. Participation.

Your Participation Action Step

Try to post at least one Update per week for a month. Building relation­ships takes time, whether in person or online. Use LinkedIn to identify and gain information about people you have just met or will be meeting, and keep using it to strengthen relationships and expand your network.

There’s more in the post on Law Technology Today.

I’ve really enjoyed getting the chance to speak about what’s in the book on podcasts and webinars recently, but have especially enjoyed spending some one-on-one time helping people improve their approach to LinkedIn, several of whom were not lawyers. Which leads to the question: “What if there were a version of this book not targeted at lawyers and other legal professionals?” Allison and I have heard that question a lot and all I can say is stay tuned for our answer to that question, which will be revealed soon.

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition can be purchased through the ABA Store or in an iBook version on iTunes.LIOHFL2 Cover

Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Box of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers 2Ed booksA box of books arrived at my door – my copies of the new Second Edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers. All of the work on a book project finally seems real and tangible when you get the box of books and hold one in your hands.

Allison Shields and I wrote the original LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers about a year-and-a-half ago. Then we wrote Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, which debuted about a year ago. We didn’t expect that we’d be writing a second edition so soon, but the massive interface and layout changes and feature updates at LinkedIn and the overwhelmingly positive response we got to the book pushed up our target for preparing a new edition.

LinkedIn’s changes continued all through the writing of the new book this summer and took a lot more work than we expected just to keep up with the changes. We also had the chance to incorporate some of our new ideas on LinkedIn, materials from articles and presentations we’ve given, practical tips and techniques Allison uses when she does training on LinkedIn, and discussion of new features.

In other words, the Second Edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is a major update and we’re proud of the new version.

Among other things, you’ll find:

    • All new illustrations, reflection the major interface changes.
    • Discussion of new features like Endorsements and a reconsideration of the use of Premium Accounts.
    • Updated material on Company Pages, Ethics, Ads, Mobile Apps and Privacy Settings.
    • Our best new practical ideas and tips for using LinkedIn in effective ways.
  • The book continues to focus on ten “lessons,” provides more detail on some advanced topics like ethics, and includes a generous helping of our favorite 60 LinkedIn tips.

    Here’s the description of the new edition from the ABA’s Web Store:

    Since the first edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers was published, LinkedIn has added almost 100 million users, and more and more lawyers are using the platform on a regular basis. Now, this bestselling ABA book has been fully revised and updated to reflect significant changes to LinkedIn’s layout and functionality made through 2013. LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition, will help lawyers make the most of their online professional networking. In just one hour, you will learn to:

    Set up a LinkedIn account

    Create a robust, dynamic profile–and take advantage of new multimedia options

    Build your connections

    Get up to speed on new features such as Endorsements, Influencers, Contacts, and Channels

    Enhance your Company Page with new functionality

    Use search tools to enhance your network

    Monitor your network with ease

    Optimize your settings for privacy concerns

    Use LinkedIn effectively in the hiring process

    Develop a LinkedIn strategy to grow your legal network

    As I write this, the book is still available with a 15% pre-order discount. Since we’ve received our author copies already, I’m going to suggest that you act quickly on the pre-order discount. There was a lot of interest in using the first edition in connection with training classes for lawyers in large firms and corporate law departments and we had that in mind when writing the second edition. If interested in that, please inquire about bulk discounts.

    The order page is here.

    Watch for news coming soon about a second book project.

    On October 17, Allison and I will presenting a webinar called LinkedIn for Lawyers Reloaded, co-sponsored by ALI CLE and the ABA’s Law Practice Division.

    Dennis Kennedy

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

    In perhaps the classic example of “I didn’t have enough time to write a shorter article, so I wrote a longer one,” I have a new article out in the February issue of the Law Practice Today webzine. It runs about 3,000 words and is called “Thirteen Facebook Tips for Lawyers in 2013.”

    As the article summary says:

    Still scared of Facebook? Come on, it’s 2013 already—can 1 billion users really all be wrong? Here are 13 tips to guide even the most reluctant late adopter on how to get the most of the most popular social media tool.

    The article offers some of my observations about lawyers using (and, mainly, not using) Facebook, thirteen practical tips (anybody else notice that matching the number of tips to the year has upped the degree of difficulty for these types of tips articles?), and three simple action steps to get yourself going on Facebook.

    The money quote:

    There are many reasons lawyers probably should be using Facebook, but I’m not sure that convince many reluctant lawyers with those reasons. Instead, consider my view that there may be no better resource than Facebook to help you reconnect with people who were important in your life with whom you have lost contact.

    I expect that Allison Shields and I will cover many of these tips in more detail in our upcoming presentation on LinkedIn and Facebook at ABA TECHSHOW 2013 in Chicago in April.You will also have the chance to talk about these topics with Allison and me at the Taste of TECHSHOW dinner we will be hosting on April 4.

    Hope you find the new article helpful.If you want to dive even deeper into Facebook, you might consider reading Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, which is also available in an iBook version.

    What other tips do you have for for lawyers to make better use of Facebook?

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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    Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.