People regularly ask me what “legal technology” or “legal tech” means when I use the terms and tell them it is something I’ve focused on for many years. In my class in Entrepreneurial Lawyering last fall in Michigan State’s LegalRnD program, I realized that “legal technology” was a term I took for granted and it was, in fact, something I needed to define and explain to my students.

Based on some ideas I picked up from Chrissie Lightfoot, a few ideas of my own, a little creativity, a little commonsense, and an infatuation with quadrant charts, I came up with the following chart for my students:

Image of Quadrant Chart

I’m now ready to unleash it on an unsuspecting and unprepared world for feedback and, I hope, improvement. I think it works as a pedagogical tool. I don’t think it quite works yet as a classic quadrant chart – I’ve never quite figured out what the Y-axis should be and I’m not sure plotting points for tools within the chart would actually work.

To me, that means the chart is ready for feedback and the wisdom of the crowd.

I’ve decided to post the chart here. Please comment or email me if you have thoughts, questions or suggestions. I’ll put it out under a Creative Commons CC BY license to make it super easy for people to use.

Tom Mighell and I have also recorded an episode on The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast in which we talk about the chart and definitions of “legal technology” or “legal tech” or “law tech”in some detail. That episode should be posted on Friday, January 18, 2019. I’ll add a a link when it’s available. It might be helpful to listen to the show and the explanations there before making suggestions. Or not.

I’m curious to see if people find this helpful or useful. If you think there’s already something better, I’d love to know that and maybe switch to that.

Also, this version is really a first and rough draft. I know that from font choices to other design and spacing, there is work to be done before I would consider it “final.” If you have strong feelings about design and are good at it and want to take a stab at an improved design, let me know and we’ll see how we might work on that.

ALSO:

Until March 31, 2019, I have a special discount code (20% off) for any readers who want to purchase the new edition of The Lawyers Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies. I have it on good authority that it makes a fabulous Valentine’s Day gift. Simply go to the ordering page for the book at
https://www.americanbar.org/products/inv/book/312056356/ and use the code TECHTOOL19 at checkout.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Now available:

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

The ABA Legal Technology Resource Center has announced its 2018 class of Women of Legal Technology honorees. It’s a stellar list, with 25 selections made from a record-setting number of nominations.

When you add the names on this list to the names on the lists for previous years, you have around 80 great candidates for speakers at conferences, on panels, and for keynotes on legal technology. It’s a great start. I don’t want to hear the excuses about not being able to find women speakers on legal tech anymore.

They also have quite a range of accomplishments. Check out the list.

A big thank you to Heidi Alexander and the rest of the selection committee (Nicole Bradick, Natalie Kelly, Sofia Lingos, Brooke Moore, Allison Shields, and Kristen Sonday) for their work on this effort and their commitment to its goals. As Heidi put it so well, “LTRC’s Women of Legal Tech initiative is intended to encourage diversity and celebrate women in legal technology.” Let us encourage and celebrate.

As always, I encourage you to check out the resources at the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

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Now available: The new second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

One of my favorite projects during my time as chair of the board for American Bar Association’s Legal Technology Resource Center has been the annual Women of Legal Tech list.

In 2015, Heidi Alexander posted a great list of women in the field of legal technology on the Law Technology Today blog. In 2016, she brought the concept to the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center to turn it into an annual recognition event.

There has been some evolution of the concept. For example, there is now a nomination and selection process, and there is a new class each year, which I think makes the combined list especially helpful to those looking for women speakers, authors and experts.

The 2017 class was announced at ABA TECHSHOW 2017. The list of this year’s class and earlier classes can be found here.

The 2018 class will be announced at ABA TECHSHOW 2018.

To submit nominations and learn about the process, go to this post on the Law Technology Today blog. Submit early and submit often. Self-nominations allowed and encouraged. The deadline is March 1, 2018.

Nomination form.

 

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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