Birthday Cake with PineappleLong-time readers of this blog will know that today is the blawgiversary of DennisKennedy.Blog. I started this blog on February 15, 2003, and we (my blog and me) are marking its thirteenth birthday today. That makes DennisKennedy.Blog a teenager. Much more about that in a minute.

In previous years, I marked the week of the blogiversary with a weeklong combined celebration of my blog’s birthday and my birthday (February 17 – shout out to birthday sharers Michael Jordan and Jim Brown). The issue of “sharing” birthday celebrations came up this year and, as you’ll notice from the title of this post, “we” decided to do something different this year.

When you have written a blog as long as I have, two things will surprise you. The first is that your blog starts to take on a life of its own and begins to talk to you, especially about its “feelings” and “needs.” The second is that you are constantly surprised which posts set off a negative reaction from readers.

This morning, we had the combination of those two things.

The problem, it seems, was yesterday’s post – a seemingly innocuous post about some of my recent writings outside the blog and some recent podcasts.

I could not have predicted the firestorm. However, when you have a new teenager, you can’t predict anything.

To make a long story short, my blog and I had what they call these days a “good talk” this morning. If you know teenagers, it won’t surprise you that words like “unfair,” “independence,” “old enough,” and the like were flying around. I also heard the word “boring” and “old man” more times than I cared to hear them.

As I now understand it, yesterday’s post hit a tender spot that I apparently have not been listening to the blog enough about. In retrospect, I get the blog’s perspective, but sheesh. Yes, the post did refer to writing I have done in places other than the blog. And, yes, I am aware that my blog sees my podcast as competition for my time, attention and best work. I now better understand why my blog found this so upsetting.

And you don’t even want to hear the comments my blog made about my use of social media.

On the other hand, I do think my best work and content lately has been on the podcast. I won’t apologize for that. I was a bit surprised, however, that my blog has been skyping with Tom Mighell’s blog and commiserating about their perceived neglect from their authors. Not to oversimplify, but they are jealous of the podcast.

For most of the discussion, if I can call it that, I listened. I also tried to make rational arguments, justifications and excuses. I also tried changing the subject and a variety of other tricks. My blog was having none of that and, I’ll admit that I’m impressed, stuck to its guns and made all of its points.

The blog even tried to get me to express my feelings and emotions.

It’s was a difficult conversation. I’m still mulling over some of the blog’s points.

One of the things that came through loud and clear is that my blog feels it deserves my most creative work. It kept returning to the point that I was no longer writing posts like the Metallica LexThink post and the Steve Gadd copyright post. And that I should be. (NIt also wants me to fix some of the internal links on the blog so that people don’t have to search for old posts using the search box at the top of the right column. I get the point.)

My blog’s contention is that posts like those are what my real audience wants and not pointers to things I’ve done in other places. Especially on my podcast. At one point, my blog literally threw a “Legal Talk Network” t-shirt across the room.

Not too surprisingly, the subject of being “old enough” for a tattoo again came up. Again.

In the past, I’ve been able to say that the blog is too young and that I make all the decisions. And my threat of getting an ear pierced and wearing an earring was a deterrent the blog on the tattoo front because it did not want to be embarrassed to death. Now, my blog seems ready to call my bluff. I’m still not convinced that my blog’s tattoo idea – a large “Cloud” with a lightning bolt that says “You only live once” is the best choice, but I understand its point that it has long been living with a photo of me “tattooed” on its front page and, even worse for it, a logo and feed for the podcast.

The bottom line. We agreed that DennisKennedy.Blog gets its own separate birthday celebration this year and going forward. We also agreed that any birthday presents to the blog will be the blog’s presents and not shared with me. Unless it wants to share – not likely.

I also agreed that I would ask readers to let us know in the comments what direction you would like to see the blog take going forward. Keep in mind, however, that my blog will see your comments before I do.

And I agreed that I needed to pay more attention to my blog and consider its feelings.

It was a difficult, contentious discussion, but a worthwhile one that will help us begin to plot a path forward.

We hugged it out at the end and said “good talk,” both nervously looking around to make sure no one was watching us.

So, I wish my blog a happy thirteenth birthday, salute it for becoming a teenager and invite you to do the same. It’s been a pleasure writing the blog all these years and I look forward to many more.

– Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

Last year, I read 53 books, just topping the goal. Or, more accurately, I listed 53 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2016. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were the Sidney Chambers series and a start on Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

59. The End of Dieting, Joel Fuhrman
58. Spark Joy, Marie Kondo
57. A Great Reckoning, Louise Penny
56. Please Kill Me, Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

November

55. Mapping Decline, Colin Gordon
54. Breaking Cover, Stella Rimington
53. An Obvious Fact, Craig Johnson
52. Think Simple, Ken Segall

October

51. Visual Intelligence, Amy Herman
50. The Noise of Time, Julian Barnes

September

49. Back from the Dead, Bill Walton
48. Any Minute Now, Eric Van Lustbader
47. The Other Side of Silence, Philip Kerr
46. The Index Card, helaine Olan and Harold Pollack

August

45. Daniel Silva, THe Black Widow
44. The Highwayman, Craig Johnson
43. The Bourne Enigma, Eric Van Lustbader
42. Even Dogs in the Wild, Ian Rankin

July

41. My Life in Middlemarch, Rebecca Mead
40. Secular Meditation, Rick Heller
39. The Encore Career Handbook, Marci ALboher
38. How to Make Your Money Last, Jane Bryant Quinn
37. The More of Less, Joshua Becker
36. The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly
35. Change Your Brain, Change Your Body, Daniel Amen
34. Change Your Brain, Change Your Life, Daniel Amen
33. The Mechanical Horse, Margaret Guroff

June

32. The Wolves, Alex Berenson
31. Living Forward, Michael Hyatt
30. The Green Mill Murder, Kerry Greenwood
29. The Castlemaine Murders, Kerry Greenwood

May

28. Dead Man’s Chest, Kerry Greenwood
27. Sprint, Jake Knapp
26. My Adventures with Your Money, T.D. Thornton

April

25. The Mulberry Bush, Charles McCarry
24. Murder in Montparnasse, Kerry Greenwood
23. Death Before Wicket, Kerry Greenwood
22. SPQR – A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
21. A Coffin for Dimitrios, Eric Ambler

March

20. In a Sunburned Country, Bill Bryson
19. Primary Greatness, Stephen Covey
18. Queen of the Flowers, Kerry Greenwood
17. Away with the Fairies, Kerry Greenwood

February

16. The Mark Inside, Amy Reading
15. What to DO to Retire Successfully, Martin Goldstein
14. The Last Kingdom, Bernard Cornwell
13. Murder on the Ballarat Train, Kerry Greenwood
12. The Spy House, Matthew Dunn
11. An Officer and a Spy, Robert Harris
10. Raisins and Almonds, Kerry Greenwood

January

9. The Gifts of Imperfection, Brene Brown
8. Quiet, Susan Cain
7. Pirate Latitudes, Michael Crichton
6. The Stuff of Life, Mark Schultz
5. APIs: A Strategy Guide, Daniel Jacobson, Greg Brail and Dan Woods
4. Momofuku, David Chang and Peter Meehan
3. Vision to Reality, Honoree Corder
2. Kettlebell Simple & Sinister, Pavel Tsatsouline
1. The War of Art, Steven Pressfield

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Dennis Kennedy photographed on December 19, 2010.Last summer, I was asked the question “Are there really too many lawyers?” I wrote a reply and remembered the other day that I never posted it.

Unlike when you write something for a print publication and might have to wait months for an article to appear, the great benefit of having your own blog is that you can publish it to the world immediately – assuming that you remember to do so.

In the spirit of clearing out 2015 to get a fresh start in 2016, here’s my answer, at least last summer (because I haven’t edited it), to the question “Are there really too many lawyers?”

Are there really too many lawyers?

The science fiction writer William Gibson (@greatdismal) his the source of the well-known quote, “The future has arrived – it’s just not evenly distributed yet.” That’s a good framework to consider the “too many lawyers” question.

That question suggests that the primary issue is one of quantity and the Goldilocksian test of too much, too little or just right. However, that approach misses the most interesting and important facets of the question – distribution, allocation and, ultimately, adaptability of lawyers and the legal profession.

There are a lot of lawyers in the US – a whole lot of them – and many more enter the profession every year. Lawyers also have a tendency not to retire, at least not at an age like 65. The total number inexorably grows.

At the same time, we all see stats that perhaps 80% of people (and probably small businesses) can’t afford or find the lawyers to perform the legal services they need. There are areas like public defenders, judges and certain practice areas where there is a strong feeling that there simply aren’t enough lawyers. In my own world of information technology law, I would say that there is a severe shortage of lawyers knowledgeable in the practice area, which expands and grows more complex almost daily, or so it seems.

Perhaps paradoxically, we also live at a time where it is very difficult for lawyers to get tradition law firm jobs. Some would argue that we’ve had a few “lost years” where only a very small fraction of law school graduates got traditional law opportunities.

What I see is not a “quantity” issue, but an imbalance of supply and demand. In other words, the future of legal services might already be here, but it’s not evenly distributed yet. There is a mismatch of client need and lawyer availability, all aggravated by technology change (think Internet), geographic mobility (general population but not lawyer regulation) and, increasingly, globalization.

The “too many lawyers” question, to me, opens up the issues of legal service distribution and allocation of legal resources and alignment with the changing needs of an increasingly mobile, global and savvy client population with difficult and novel legal issues.

In so many ways, the practice of law has never been so interesting as it is today, with opportunities for creative approaches, futuristic technology tools, and ways to play a key role in the accelerating pace of change we see today.

However, too often today lawyers bemoan the “decline of the profession,” want to pull up the drawbridges and fill up the moats, and try to go back in time to some “mythical good times.”

We live in a world where commerce routes around “friction.” Lawyers have too often allowed themselves to be seen as part of the friction rather than the enablers of new approaches. The path of the Internet is littered with those who felt that what they did was so unique that the Internet would not be able to route around them.

The successful lawyers of the near future will be those who can better distribute and make available their services to the clients who need them. The successful firms will be the ones best able to identify, hire, retain and allocate lawyers to client needs. It’s not rocket science, but it requires a clear-eyed look at the present and the future and a willingness to look to new models rather than return to old structures. At least in my opinion.

The key is adaptability. Can lawyers adapt to changing times? It is reasonable to expect drastic changes on a regular basis within traditional practice areas. It is reasonable to expect clients to change, evolve and disappear. Lawyers must be adaptable to an accelerating pace of change.

Too many lawyers? I don’t know if there’s a magic number. I do know that the number of lawyers is not well distributed from the client perspective. Too many lawyers with adaptability? Not by a long shot. And, unfortunately for many lawyers who hesitate on adapting, the future is already here.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Welcome to the 2015 edition of Dennis Kennedy’s annual Best of Law-related Blogging Awards, affectionately known as the “Blawggies.”

Dennis Kennedy photo
The Blawggies, which honor the best law-related blogs as determined from my personal and highly-opinionated perspective, were first unleashed on an unsuspecting blogosphere in December 2004 and are an annual tradition here at DennisKennedy.Blog.

In perhaps the majority of those 12 years, there has been an end-of-the-year debate about whether blogging, especially law-related blogging is “dead” or no longer relevant. 2015 is no exception. I like what Kevin O’Keefe has to say on that topic.

I’ve started to wonder whether there might be some truth and substance at the foundation of those questions. It strikes me there are fewer memorably individual blogs than ever before even though there are plenty of firm and group blogs. And there are plenty of niche and practice-area blogs. However, there is definitely less of what Dave Winer drives at in his seminal definition of a blog – “the unedited voice of a person.” I have always liked that definition of blogging.

I also realize that the blogs I read are not the same blogs that many other lawyers read – for many different reasons. It has become difficult to appreciate what blogs are part of what the “general legal audience” reads. Perhaps selfishly (and tautologically), I ultimately care about only the blogs that I care about.

At the same time, longtime bloggers have turned to social media, podcasts and video as better media for them than blogging, even though their blogs still exist. I’m an example of that, with a posting frequency of about a post a month. I see the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast as the primary outlet for what I was once writing on my blog. TKMR Logo
To a lesser extent, my ABA Journal column is also an outlet for material that would have gone into my blog in the past.

ANNOUNCING THE 2015 BLAWGGIE WINNERS. When I looked over the 2014 Blawggie awards in preparation for making the 2015 Blawggie awards, I decided that it really was a good list and I wasn’t sure how I’d change it for 2015.

After much thought and consultation, my blog and I have decided that for the 2015 Blawggie Awards, the winners are the 2014 Blawggie Award winners.

In a way, that feels a bit like cheating, so we needed to come up with something extra for you the reader.

Since I have have turned so much toward audio and podcasts for information and entertainment in the place of blogs, I thought it might be good to offer readers a glimpse into the podcasts I listen to and how I now use podcasts.

Podcast Listening App. Another iTunes update that broke the Podcast app, and I moved away from iTunes plus the Apple Podcast app to the dedicated podcast app, Overcast (now free). Although there are some differences that impact the way I used to organize podcasts for listening, I’m generally happy with the switch, especially Overcast’s approach to speeding up the playback of podcasts and squeezing dead air out of podcasts. You can also use Overcast as an online service at Overcast.FM.

Podcast Search. I found iTunes podcast search to be a great way to do research. If I wanted a good overview of a topic, an interview of a book author, or other information, either introductory or advanced, on a topic, searching for relevant podcast episodes on iTunes was a great way to do that. Overcast is not as good, but OK for now. I cannot recommend this approach to using podcasts episodes to find focused information enough. Another handy podcast search tool is Huffduffer.

Listen to Podcasts on a Trial Basis. When I find an interesting podcast, go ahead and subscribe to it. If it’s not that interesting to me, I unsubscribe fairly quickly. Not all podcasts or podcasts episodes are great or what you want. That’s why listening at a higher speed is a great approach. Listen and edit aggressively.

Law-related Podcasts. The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast is on the Legal Talk Network. LTN has a lot of great law-related podcasts and is always the best place to start for finding useful law-related podcasts in one place. For other law-related podcasts, you’ll have to do some searching and know what you are looking for. Using iTunes to search for and identify promising podcasts in your area of interest is a great way to start.

Podcasts Related to Your Practice. Ultimately, law-related podcasts may not be the tool that helps you the most. If you represent clients in certain industries, podcasts on the industries might be way more helpful to you than legal podcasts. In my world of digital payments, podcasts like the Consult Hyperion podcast and Payments of Fire are much more useful that any law-related podcasts I’ve found. Podcasts that keep you up on news, developments, trends, industry players and the like may well make your clients feel that you are much more helpful as a lawyer.

A Huge Sampling of Podcasts I Listen to These Days. I’m disappointed that there’s not a great way to collect, send out and share links to podcasts episodes that you like. Huffduffer is one example. Some people tweet about a great podcast episode. But it’s hard to make the move from seeing a link to listening to the episode. Here are some podcasts I’ve enjoyed at various time in 2015 to give you some ideas of what podcasts you might want to try. I’ve added links (a process that only reinforced for me how difficult it is to share links to podcasts – I suggest looking for any of these that interests you in iTunes our the podcast app you use).

A16z
Ari Meisel – Less Doing
Bill Simmons Podcast
Consult Hyperion podcast
Cool Tools
The Critical Path
The Current from CBC Radio
Cycling 360
Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast
Great Work Podcast
Happier with Gretchen Rubin
HBR Idealist
In Our Time
the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast (of course)
Lawyerist Podcast
Legal Talk Network podcasts
Listen to Lucy (Financial Times)
Mac Power Users
The Needle and the Mouse
Pardon the Interruption
Payments of Fire
Rdella Training
Seminars about Long-term Thinking
The Slate Political Gabfest
Spark from CBC Radio
TechNation Radio Podcast
The Torch: The Great Courses Podcast
Wealthtrack’s Podcast
What’s the Point

Well, there you have it – the 2015 Blawggie Awards post. The winners can be found here. The Blawggies have always aimed to inform, educate and surprise. In 2015, the emphasis was on surprise.

Best wishes to all for 2016.

– DennisKennedy.Blog and Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Birthday Cake with PineappleTwelve years ago today, I launched this blog. I decided to call the blog simply DennisKennedy.Blog.

My blog and I celebrated the birth day quietly today, with only a little fanfare, as we awaited a large winter storm predicted for St. Louis.We talked at length about the positive response the blog has always gotten and the many great people the blog has introduced to me. My blog likes to claim most of the credit, of course, but, after twelve years, we both will admit it’s been a great collaboration. My blog also felt that the best birthday gift I could have given it was the revamping and redesign of the site last year.

In earlier years, I sometimes devoted a whole week to the blawgiversary of this blog and my own birthday. Longtime readers will recall that the blog was an early birthday present to myself in 2003. In the blawgiversary week, I often asked for questions from my audience and tried to answer them.

My blog and I are again offering to answer questions about the blog, blogging, legal tech or other things that interest you/ As always, I reserve the right to avoid questions or to cleverly answer an easier question than the one you actually ask. You can pose a question in the comments or by emailing me.

I also wanted to remind readers that the best way to read this blog is by subscribing to its RSS feed.

It’s been a great twelve years. My blog and I hope to keep it going for many more. Thanks for being a great audience.

– Dennis and DennisKennedy.Blog

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Facebook book with box

Last year, I read 58 books, 6 more than in 2013. Or, more accurately, I listed 58 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2015. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were Robert van Gulik’s Judge Dee mysteries and Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

53. How to Meditate, Pema Chodron
52. Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
51. The Meditation Transformation Jennifer Brooks
50. One Dot, Two Dots, Get Some New Dots, David Silverstein
49. Kerry Greenwood Blood and Circuses
48. Flying Too High, Kerry Greenwood
47. Cociane Blues, Kerry Greenwood
46. Ross Poldark, Winston Graham

November

45. Better Than Before, Gretchen Rubin
44. Indian Summer, Alex Von Tunzelmann
43. Jerusalem: City of Mirrors, Amos Elon
42.What I Saw, Joseph Roth
41. Money: Master the Game, Tony Robbins

October

40. If You Didn’t Bring Jerky, What Di I Just Eat?, Bill Heavey

September

39. The Long Way Home, Louise Penny

August

38. Billie Holiday: The Musician and the Myth, John Szwed
37. The Nature of the Beast, Louise Penny
36. Less Doing, More Living, Ari Meisel
35. Sidney Chambers and the Forgiveness of Sins, James Runcie
34. The English Spy, Daniel Silva
33. Sidney Chambers and the Perils of the Night, James Runcie
32. Sidney Chambers and the Problem of Evil, James Runcie
31. Sidney Chanbers and the Shadow of Death, James Runcie
30. Tomorrowland, Steven Kotler
29. The Age of Cryptocurrency, Paul Vigna and Michael Casey
28. Dreaming Spies, Laurie R. King

July

27. The Janson Equation, Douglas Corleone
26. The Outsiders, Gerald Seymour

June

25. All the Old Knives, Olen Steinhauer
24. Becoming Steve Jobs, Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli
23. Data and Goliath, Bruce Schneier
22. How to Do More in Less Time, Allison Shields and Dan Siegel
21. John Robison, Be Different

May

20. Dry Bones, Craig Johnson
19. The Lady from Zagreb, Philip Kerr
18. Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates, Howard Pyle
17. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
16. 1177, The Year Civilization Collapsed, Eric Cline

April

15. The Republic of Pirates, Colin Woodward
14. Flash Points, George Friedmann
13. The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin
12. The Geneva Strategy, Jamie Freveletti
11. Retribution, David Hagberg

March

10. Slim by Design, Brian Wansink
9. Twelve Days, Alex Berenson
8. Waking Up, Sam Harris
7. Zero to One, Peter Thiel
6. The Journal of Best Practices, David Finch

February

5. Austria, Culture Smart
4. Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, Think Like a Freak
3. The Resilience Dividend, Judith Rodin

January

2. Ada’s Algorithm, James Essinger
1. The Lean Startup, Eric Ries

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

William Barns Graham at the GC Research Club interviewed me a while back about technology as it relates to in-house counsel, some of my uses of technology, collaboration and other topics. The interview originally ran in two parts, but has been collected conveniently in one place, as “GCRC Interview: Dennis Kennedy, Vice President, Counsel at MasterCard Worldwide – Whole Interview” on the GCResearchClub.com website, along with other interviews, all of which I would recommend. It’s nice to be able to reach an international audience with this interview.

Ann Page, in her “JANUARY 2014 REPORT – Legal Department Technological Solutions – What To Consider and Where To Start?“, highlighted a quote from the interview:

Because legal work is so collaborative, there’s a push to use new collaborative technologies, communication technologies and specialized practice technologies on an ongoing basis. We’ve still yet to get much past breaking the surface of analytical, automation and knowledge management tools.

In the interview, I talked about:

  • How my experience in law and technology complement each other
  • What technologies in-house counsel can use to better align their work to the demands of their employees
  • Whether lawyers and IT departments work well enough together
  • How big “cyberlaw” might become
  • Some of the technologies I personally use
  • Useful phone and tablet apps for lawyers

I had fun doing the interview and had fun re-reading it the other day. You might also find the interview worth your time and effort, especially if you are an in-house counsel or work with in-house counsel.

Let me know what you think.

Link to full interview.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Birthday Cake with PineappleEleven years ago today, with an allusion to Babylon 5 and the ideas that I needed to produce my own RSS feed and experiment with new types of writing, I launched this blog. I called the blog simply DennisKennedy.Blog.

Much has happened with me and this blog over those eleven years. I appreciate the positive responses my blog has always seemed to generate, the many doors it has opened and the great people it has introduced me to.

One of the most interesting criticisms I’ve consistently gotten over the years is that I have a tendency to anthropomorphize my blog. I think that criticism is somewhat overstated. My blog, on the other hand, thinks that criticism is, well, just crazy talk.

Earlier today, my blog and I were discussing where things stood at the 11-year mark. I mentioned that I had been feeling that I hadn’t been paying the blog as much attention as I wanted over the past year or so, even though my intentions were good. In my defense, I noted that it wasn’t like I wasn’t doing any else in my limited spare time – two new books, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition) and LinkedIn in One Hour, the Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast (the 120th episode – on living in multiple tech worlds – just released), my ABA Journal tech column (the February column is on social media), speaking (e.g., at the upcoming 2014 ABA TECHSHOW) and webinars (e.g., the upcoming one on Top Tech Trends), the occasional article or interview, helping build the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center (check out the 2013 Tech Report) and Law Technology Today blog, and dabbling in social media. Not to forget the 10th edition of the Blawggie Awards.

That was not the best approach to take with a blog that was already feeling a little neglected.

I certainly got an earful from my blog – most of which would be unprintable – and the stinging and memorable comment that my blog felt it might as well write its own posts rather than wait on me. Message heard and understood. As they say, that opened up the communication channel and we discussed the future direction of the blog, put together an action plan, and made up in time to have some blawgiversary cake.

The plan is to redesign and revamp the website, with my blog becoming even more so the main focus of the site. That will take care of a current bug that affects the ability of users of some browsers to see new blog posts – the best way to read this blog for now is by subscribing to its RSS feed). The other content of the website will be drastically streamlined and updated, all with the idea of making it easier to access all the different things I’m doing, no matter where they are located.

This plan certainly made my blog happier – and me too. I’m talking with my web designer about the path forward and a timeline.

In the meantime, I’d certainly welcome any suggestions readers might have about revamping the site, especially portions that you want to see retained and brought up-to-date. I’m also curious whether there might be interest in a free ebook version of the entire blog archive. Let me know.

It’s been eleven great years. My blog and I hope to keep it going for many more. Thanks for being a great audience.

– Dennis and DennisKennedy.Blog

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read exactly 52 books. Or, more accurately, I listed exactly 52 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on. 2013 was an unusual year for me, too, in the significant number of books I started and gave up on before finishing.

I’m doing the same thing in 2014. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

58. Wait for Signs, Craig Johnson
57. Bitcoin and the Future of Money, Jose Pagliery
56. FastExercise, Michael Mosley
55. The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs, Greil Marcus
54. The Counterfeit Agent, Alex Berenson

November

53. The Heist, Dan Silva
52. Jobs-to-be-Done: The Handbook, Chris Spiek and Bob Moesta
51. Rock Breaks Scissors, William Poundstone
50. The American Mission, Matthew Palmer

October

49. How the Light Gets In, Louise Penny
48. The Outlandish Companion, Diana Gabaldon
47. The Brutal Telling, Louise Penny
46. Talk Like TED, Carmine Gallo
45. Driving Honda, Jeffrey Rothfeder

September

44. The First 90 Days, Michael Watkins
43. There Goes Gravity, Lisa Robinson
42. Wild Storm, Richard Castle
41. The March of Mobile Money, Sam Pitroda and Mehul Desai
40. A Trick of the Light, Louise Penny
39. A Rule Against Murder, Louise Penny
38. Rework, Jason Fried

August

37. How the World Sees You, Sally Hogshead
36. The Fires of the Gods, I. J. Parker
35. The Cruelest Month, Louise Penny
34. The Beautiful Mystery, Louise Penny

July

33. Murder on the Home Front, Molly Lefebure
32. Saints of the Shadow Bible, Ian Rankin
31. You are Your Own Gym, Mike Laurer
30. Still Life, Louise Penny

June

29. Let Loose the Dogs, Maureen Jennings
28. Poor Tom is Cold, Maureen Jennings
27. Jony Ive, Leander Kahney

May

26. Any Other Name, Craig Johnson
25. Soccer in Sun and Shadow, Eduardo Galeano
24. How to be Danish, Patrick Kingsley
23. Pitch Perfect, Bill McGowan
22. A Short Guide to a Long Life, David Agus
21. George Washington’s Secret Six, Brian Kilmeade
20. The Janson Option, Paul Garrison
19. The Vikings, Neil Oliver

April

18. The Haunted Monastery, Robert Van Gulik
17. Night Work, Laurie R. King
16. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, Brad Stone
15. The Mongolian Conspiracy, Rafael Bernal

March

14. The Bourne Retribution, Eric Van Lustbader
13. Judge Dee at Work, Robert Van Gulik
12. Wild Fermentation, Sandor Ellix Katz

February

11. The Chinese Lake Murders, Robert Van Gulik
10. The Chinese Gold Murders, Robert Van Gulik
9. Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, Robert Van Gulik

January

8. How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Scott Adams
7. Europe Between the Oceans, Barry Cunliffe
6. Feldenkrais:The Busy Person’s Guide to Easier Movement, Frank Wildman
5. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, John Lukacs
4. Spirit of Steamboat, Craig Johnson
3. A Man Without Breath, Philip Kerr
2. A Cook’s Tour, Anthony Bourdain
1. Italian Ways, Tim Parks

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Ten years ago (February 15, 2003), I launched this blog and it’s striking how much that has happened to me since can be traced to this blog.

The original post started with a reference to my favorite science fiction TV series, Babylon 5, and said:

And so it begins . . .

I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (https://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

This blog, which I named DennisKennedy.Blog, was my early birthday present to myself in 2003 (my birthday is actually in two days, on the 17th). I saw it as a place to experiment with my writing and the best way to generate my own RSS feed (the feed was something I wanted much more than just a “blog” and blogging software was the easiest way to generate an RSS feed). Both of those reasons remain true today.

I also remember how, at the time, I had the feeling that whole blog thing had already happened and that I’d missed it. I’m always surprised by how much time it took me after I had started speaking and writing about blogs to launch my own blog.

One of the annual traditions on this blog is to have an extravagant blawgiversary (or blogiversary) celebration. Another thing I tend to do (which some have even criticized me for – little do they understand how close you can get to a blog after a few years) is to anthromorphize this blog.

I mention both things, because my blog has made it clear that it wants just a low-key, stay at home, no presents please blawgiversary for number 10. The blog is feeling a little introspective and contemplative on this occasion, as am I.

I will say, on my blog’s behalf, that it’s been a great ten years and we look forward to many more. There are so many people to thank and we appreciate all the readers over the years, especially those who have been reading since the beginning. We also want to give a big welcome to new readers.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.