Woman with ipad celebrating successLawyers are trained to think in ways that can be the opposite of good innovation practices. We spot issues and potential problems, with an emphasis on problems. We identify and manage risks, with an emphasis on the risks of doing new things. We focus, sometimes agonizingly, on process, procedure, and precedent. Saying that something “has

Welcome to my occasional series of posts of excerpts from my book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and Other Legal Organizations. The book is available in paperback and on Kindle on Amazon.

In this chapter, I focus on the importance of coaching and mentoring and

Cover photo of Successful Innovation Outcomes in LawSummer is here and the time is right for innovating in the law.

From today until June 13, the Kindle version (only) of my book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and Other Legal Organizations is on sale on amazon for the too-low-to-resist price of US$4.99.

This summer,

Book cover of Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and Other Legal OrganizationsAn often underestimated part of the innovation process, especially within law departments, is the messaging, presentation, and selling of innovation projects, programs, and portfolios to general counsel and other decisionmakers in law departments. I wrote about this topic in my book, Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and

Excerpt from Successful Innovation Outcomes in Law: A Practical Guide for Law Firms, Law Departments and Other Legal Organizations, by Dennis Kennedy.

A greatly-underused resource for innovation programs is the advisory board. Advisory boards are a group of experts who provide advice, industry and customer knowledge, market awareness, subject matter expertise, and the like. They

I decided last weekend that it was time to kill off some of my innovation ideas and projects, both personal and professional.

And my timing might have been right because yesterday I watched a great Strategyzer webinar called “Why Killing Ideas is Key in Innovation,” featuring Alex Osterwalder, Tendayi Viki, and Uwe Kirscner. A replay