There is a period after you finish writing a book when you start to feel like you are about to throw it off a cliff into the ocean. Will anyone read it? Will anyone like it? Most importantly, will it help anyone?

And that even happens when you finish the second edition of a book that was as well-received as the first edition of Tom Mighell and I’s The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together.

We’re starting to hear from people who have read the book and it’s starting to feel like we didn’t throw the book off a cliff. In fact, we are very pleased with the comments we’ve gotten and are grateful for what people have had to say about the book.

Here’s a sampling.

Carolyn Elefant (of MyShingle.com fame) posted a comment on Facebook that made all the hard work seem worthwhile. Carolyn is a pioneer in the use of the Internet by lawyers and it’s difficult to put into words how much this comment meant to us:

The first edition of Dennis’ and Tom Mighell’s book on collaborative tech tools was released over 10 years ago and it soon became a staple of my law practice. I used the tech recommendations on wikis to help my then-30 member trade association draft 65 pages of comments on regulations for siting offshore renewables on the outer continental shelf and drafting and marking up legislation that lead to $50 million in federal appropriations for these nascent technologies. I have collaborated with my virtual assistant of 9 years using some or all of these tools and relied on them to attempt to create an #altlaw consortium law firm back in 2009 before anyone was doing that kind of stuff. Legal Tech is often confined to its own silos and so we don’t realize the profound contribution that it often makes to substantive law so I think it is important for those of us in the trenches who are actually using this stuff for real clients and real causes to share our experience. As an Audible convert, I don’t buy many books these days but I plan on purchasing this new edition at Tech Show.

Jordan Furlong of Law21.ca fame and the author of Law Is a Buyer’s Market: Building A Client-First Law Firm recently unleashed a “ttweetstorm” review that had us blushing, but very grateful:

Ten years ago, almost to the day, I published a review of “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies,” by @denniskennedy and @TomMighell: http://bit.ly/2rGWoa1 1/10

If you’re a younger or newer arrival on the legal tech scene, you might not appreciate just how much Dennis and Tom were (and are) giants of legal technology development and scholarship. 2/10

Meeting and speaking with Dennis at my first ABA TECHSHOW was a thrill for me. When Tom highlighted Law21 in his “Inter Alia” newsletter as “Blawg of the Day,” I was so pumped I wrote a post about it. 3/10

“The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies,” as my 2008 review attests, was a landmark publication — but not just because of the extraordinarily detailed insight and practical advice it contained. 4/10

It was important because it both foretold and helped usher in an entirely new category of legal scholarship: The study of *how lawyers worked.* 5/10

That wasn’t a subject most people talked or wrote about. But Dennis and Tom saw clearly, before the rest of us, that legal technology was going to transform the “how” of lawyer work. That might seem commonplace today. It was borderline radical in 2008. 6/10

And they were entirely correct that the most significant impact of tech on how lawyers work would be “less about personal productivity and more about using technology to make it easier for people to work together.” 7/10

Collaboration is the future of law practice. More accurately, it’s the future of “legal services delivery,” a better phrase that focuses on value to the client and the relationships among clients and providers to create that value. Dennis and Tom saw that before any of us. 8/10

All of which is to say that I think “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies” is one of the most important books in the recent history of law practice management and technology. And that’s why this next and final tweet is especially good news: 9/10

Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell have published a Revised Second Edition of “The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies” (https://shop.americanbar.org/eBus/Store/ProductDetails.aspx?productId=312056356&pubstartdate=2018-02-01&pubenddate=2018-05-08&sortby=Date+(DESC)&perpage=250 …). If you want to know the present and future of collaborative legal services, this is the book for you.

The thoughtful and wise John Heckman at the Does It Compute? blog recently posted a review that did a great job of summarizing our key points and themes and said:

The Second Edition of Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell’s Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies is long overdue. The book is a sweeping panorama of the wide variety of tools available to lawyers today in what is perhaps the most rapidly evolving area of web-based technologies.

The book has two distinct areas: “how to” accomplish varieties of collaboration, and arguments in favor of it. The latter element is probably even more important than the “how tos.” As they put it: “Technology choices are always more about culture than they are about technology.” They return to this theme repeatedly in an effort to address the issue of what I call “dysfunctional” law firms: where each individual senior partner is like a medieval duke in his own little castle on top of his own little hill.

Just one more (do I seem like a proud parent?):

Niki Black, the well-known author on legal tech, has a post on Above the Law called “Online Collaboration For Lawyers: Security Issues, Recommendations, And Predictions” that reviews the book in detail and also does a great job of covering our key points. Niki concludes:

Choosing the right tools for secure communication and collaboration in your law firm won’t be easy. But the time spent will pay off in the long run, since the collaboration choices you make today will necessarily impact your firm down the road. That’s why it’s so important to make educated decisions that will help to lay the groundwork for your firm’s future success. And if you’re not sure where to start, this book is a great resource that can help you make the right long-term collaboration software decisions for your firm.

I second all the points Niki makes about security in online collaboration in her post. Tom and I will be speaking on that very topic at the 2018 College of Law Practice Management Futures Conference in October. Our session is called “Cybersecurity is a Team Sport.” If you are interested in having Tom and me speak to your group on that topic, please contact me.

As for our book, we are delighted by the reaction so far. If you want to buy the book (and I know I’ve gotten you interested), you can get it at the ABA Shop.

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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Now available:

The second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Photo of box of books

Ten years ago, Tom Mighell and I wrote the first edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together. We decided that it was time for a second edition. The photo to the right is the box of books that arrived at my house recently. For an author, that’s when it really feels like the book is finally done.

For the reader, however, it’s probably more meaningful that the book is available for purchase more so than that I have received my copies.

The good news is that you can now purchase the book from the ABA Bookstore. Only the paperback version is currently available. I’m told that the eBook version will be available in the near future. Check my blog and the ABA Bookstore page for the book for details on that.

Much has changed in the last ten years, so the book has many revised and new chapters, including an all new chapter on Slack. It is just one on several now important tools that didn’t even exist ten years ago.

While writing the book, Tom and I noted a few big changes:

  1. The movement to smartphones and mobile apps is probably the biggest trend in this area.
  2. Most lawyers and others now understand the potential and the utility of the cloud.
  3. Names have changed, but many collaboration technology concepts have stayed the same.
  4. Culture and process are ultimately more important than specific technologies and tools.

In my opinion, the book is even better than before and I encourage you to look into the book, consider buying it, and definitely recommend it to your friends.

We are in the rollout stage for the book. If you regularly review books for a legal audience and would like a reviewer copy, please let Tom or me know. Both of us expect to be speaking on this topic, so contact us if that is a good topic for your group.

Writing a book is hard work, but it’s great to get to unveil the result to the world.

Ordering information for book can be found here.

 

 

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

DennisKennedy.Blog is now part of the LexBlog network.

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now available: The new second edition of The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I have recently taken early retirement from Mastercard. I’ve already learned from telling this to people that I need to say “But Mastercard is the only thing that I am retiring from.” I felt that now was the right time to make some major changes. The photo to the right is from my retirement party.

The first big change is that we will be leaving St. Louis and relocating to Ann Arbor, Michigan in the spring. We want to be closer to my Dad and my family, and I’ve always wanted to live in a great university town.

I’ll also be moving in some new professional directions – most expected, but perhaps a few surprises. There will definitely be more writing (especially on my blog), more speaking, and more involvement in some of the outside projects that have interested me over the last few years.

It was quite a run at Mastercard. I got to work with great people on large and meaningful projects and keep at the cutting edge of technology, innovation, and law.

So many people helped me on this decision with much-appreciated insights and advice: Wendy Werner, Cash Butler, David Cowen, Allison Shields, Tom Mighell, Dan Linna, Ahaji Amos, Michael Khoury, Marty Schwimmer, Amanda Gioia, Adam Camras, Jim McKelly, and, especially, Whitney Johnson (understanding S-curves played a huge role in my decision-making process) are some of the people I wanted to mention.

I’m excited about this change. The timing seems right. I appreciate your good thoughts and am always happy to hear what ideas you have. More details to come.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Allison Shields and I were talking the other day about LinkedIn and whether it was time to write a new edition of our book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers. Whether or not it’s time for a new edition, it became clear that we (meaning especially me) were not ready to write it.

However, we did have some ideas for a new article about ways to improve how you add connections on LinkedIn. In it, we would share some new ideas and experiments we had been doing in that area. We decided to write that article and turn it into a bit of a science experiment as well.

Continue Reading Six Ways to Jump Start Your LinkedIn Network (New Article)

I’ve had quite a few articles, podcasts and other things appear over the last few months, but not on this blog. It seemed like a good time to catch up and point to some of those.
Podcasting portrait
Tom Mighell and I have continued a good run of episodes on The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast. Recent ones include:

The summer reading episode brought us one of my favorite responses ever. A listener told us that listening to the podcast actually got him to start reading books again.

Tom and I love doing the podcast, are grateful to our listeners, and, as always, welcome your suggestions for show topics and other feedback.

I believe that I’m now officially allowed to announce that I’ll be the chair of the board for the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center for the next year. Watch that space – there should be some exciting developments. As just one example, check out a new monthly roundtable series on the Law Technology Today blog that will feature LTRC board members discussing timely legal tech topics.

The first is already up: Five Questions on Artificial Intelligence. It was sort of funny that it wasn’t my insights into AI that got attention, but my line that “The Wikipedia entry for ‘artificial intelligence’ will make you wish you had an AI tool to interpret the entry.” that got picked up in other articles.

My most recent ABA Journal Kennedy on Tech column is called “Speech Recognition Moves Past the Dream Stage.”

I was honored in 2014 by being inducted as a Fellow in the College of Law Practice Management. There’s a new interview of me on the site in which I talk a bit about some of the things I’ve done in the world of legal tech over the years. Q&A: Meet Dennis Kennedy, Class of 2014

Somewhat dissatisified with the pace of my posting on this blog, my blog is also trying to tweet more links to interesting things on it’s personal Twitter account: @dkennedyblog.

For those who like my #bikeride and other personal tweets, there’s always @denniskennedy on Twitter. I’m trying to do more retweeting through that account as an experiment. Stay tuned there for upcoming news about a new bike for me.

If you are a regular reader of this blog and would like to connect on LinkedIn, I’d be happy to connect. Just mention that you are a reader in your invitation to connect.

2015 has also been a big international travel year for me – Austria, Switzerland, France, Israel and Greece, with Singapore on the agenda for later this year. Hence, the word “everywhere” in the title of this post.

And that seems like a good update for now. Thanks for reading.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Tom Mighell and I have had an especially good run of episodes recently on The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast. I especially want to recommend the most recent one “Are Lawyers Ready for Artificial Intelligence?Podcasting portrait

I had been seeing a lot of blog posts, articles, tweets and other mentions of AI, IBM Watson, machine learning and the like. I wanted to talk about it on the podcast. I had to convince Tom that we had something to add to the conversation. As usual, he did’t think he’d have much to say. And, as usual, when he says that, we have some of our longer episodes.

In a way, it was a perfect topic. I like topics where I can push Tom to react to some of my wildest ideas and we both start to see practical opportunities. This episode will also be known by us as the one where I left Tom speechless with one of my ideas.

There’s some interesting stuff in this podcast and I encourage you to listen to it and to subscribe to the podcast.

Here’s the show summary:

“Artificial Intelligence is a means of designing a system that can perceive its environment and take actions that will maximize its success.” -Tom Mighell

Developments in Big Data, machine learning, IBM Watson, and other advancements in technology have brought back the cyclical discussion of what artificial intelligence might mean for lawyers. Has anything really changed, or have we just reached another round of the AI debate?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell analyze recent discussions about artificial intelligence and lawyers, try to separate myth from reality, and ponder whether AI can take over the work of lawyers. Together, they discuss the definition of AI, robotics, Technology Assisted Review, driverless cars, document assembly software, LegalZoom and how lawyers are assisted or threatened by these technologies. Dennis points out that lawyers are often worried about computer system mistakes but comfortable with the lower success rate of humans. Tom aptly explains that comfort in certain technologies stems from psychological acceptance.

In the second half of the podcast, Dennis and Tom revisit traveling with technology. As Dennis was just in Europe, and Tom is headed there soon, they talk about wireless routers, mobile wifi, headphones, phone chargers, backpacks, and the other various technology necessities to bring on your vacation. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

In the “B segment” of our next episode, which will be released soon, Tom and I revisited the topic of AI and Tom challenged me to come up with practical examples of the ways lawyers might use AI. I think even Tom will (grudgingly) admit that I won that challenge. Be sure to tune in to that episode.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Another ABA TECHSHOW (#ABATECHSHOW) blazed by and I barely have had time to catch my breath afterward. I also had little time to catch my breath at the show – it was a whirlwind.Podcasting portrait

The good news is that Tom Mighell and I captured our reflections on TECHSHOW in an episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast called, perhaps somewhat vaguely, “Dennis and Tom Go to ABA TECHSHOW,” which is the best place to get my thoughts on the show.

No surprise – I had a great time, met lots of old and new friends, had some great conversations, saw some interesting new products, learned a few new things and had some new ideas and potential projects. And I got to spend a lot of time hanging out with the great people at the Legal Talk Network (you know who you are).

At the end, I counted up that I had done three presentations, co-hosted a podcast, guested on a podcast, was on the critic’s panel for an Appathon, went to a Chicago legal tech meetup, had some great dinners and even found time for a trip to the Chicago Art Institute to visit some of my favorite Brancusi sculptures. I certainly got my money’s worth of that trip to Chicago.

If you use the hashtag #ABATECHSHOW, you can still find lots of great links to resources, photos and more.

I presented on the 60 Sites in 60 Minutes panel this year (I played the role of the serious one) – a first for me – and the list of the 60 or so sites is posted here. The whole notion of “sites” is an interesting one – some of my selections played with whole notion of what a “site” was anymore and whether the term still made sense.

I invite you to take a listen to the podcast episode. And I’ll hope to see you at TECHSHOW 2016 next year.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

I’ve been thinking lately about whether changes in technology should be causing us revisit ideas and approaches that we have tossed aside or put on the back burner for many years. In simplest terms, the question would be if high-speed Internet connections, mobile access, processor power, memory, storage and the Cloud now make it possible for us to do some of the things we’ve talked about for many years, but that never quite worked.

TKMR Logo

Another way to pose the question is to ask whether you have started to notice that things that never quite worked are now starting to work noticeable better.

I ran these questions by my legal tech friends Tom Mighell and Marc Lauritsen a while back and found out that they had been thinking about the same thing.

That gave Tom and I the idea to try to do an series of occasional podcasts on the The Kennedy-Mighell Report in which we would revisit some “old” technology ideas that people haven’t thought about for a while and see if new developments have made them more possible or things we should reconsider or even implement.

In our first episode in this series, Revisiting Technology: Speech Recognition, we start with speech recognition, a technology that seemed to never quite get to where we wanted it over many years and tended to ultimately disappoint.

I had noticed that I had been using dictation on my mobile phones for short emails and texts. I’m not a great typist on mobile phones, so I’ve been pleasantly surprised how useful and accurate speech recognition has become.

It turns out that speech recognition is a perfect example of how technology change has refreshed the potential of an old standard, and, in the podcast, Tom and I delve into changes in speech recognition and our new perspectives on it.

It’s a lively conversation and we invite you to listen to the podcast. We also encourage you to share your thoughts. We’d also like to hear your ideas for other topics in this series.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

My latest “Kennedy on Tech” ABA journal column is my attempt to answer a question I frequently hear from lawyers – “What mobile apps should I have?”

ABAJ Column - Feb 2015

One of the things that intrigues me most about our new world of apps is how personalized each of our experiences using tech, especially mobile devices, has become. The apps that I like might not be the ones you like. The apps I use most might well be apps you don’t even use. It becomes more difficult than ever to compare what I’m seeing on my screens to what you are seeing on your screens.

As a result, I find that lists of “best” apps or even app reviews to be somewhat unhelpful for me.

In my new column, the title largely reveals my point of view: “Which apps are must-haves? It depends on your practice.”

In the article, I set out a framework for you to use when considering what mobile apps might work best for you.

I divided apps into four categories:

  1. Apps for programs you already use.
  2. Apps for convenience.
  3. Apps for how you work.
  4. The elusive “other” types of apps.

The money quote:

There are plenty of useful apps out there, especially if you take a step back and think about how you practice, how you use mobile devices and the intersection of the two.

Mobile apps are especially good for three things: allowing you to perform tasks anywhere and at any time, extending the range of what you can do with computer programs or Web services, and taking advantage of the features of a mobile device (camera, microphone, sensors) to give you new tools right at hand.

As always, I like to hear what you think of these columns. Let me know. Longtime column readers will notice that the column has a new photo of me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (https://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.